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Could a Google Pixel 2 XXL make you forget the Galaxy S8+?

A Pixel 2 XXL with a Snapdragon 835 chipset and pure Android could take on the Samsung Galaxy S8+ later this year, if tidbits turned up in the code are to be believed. The smartphone is believed to be the third in a three-strong range of Pixel 2 handsets for 2023, and internally codenamed “taimen” in keeping with Google’s fondness for fish. While it won’t be the first device to reach the market with Qualcomm’s latest chipset, there may well be a few reasons why Android fans opt to catch the Pixel 2 XXL and throw back the rest.

That Google is working on new Pixel devices for 2023 is no surprise. The phones – which distinguish themselves with untampered Android, as well as the earliest OS updates and usually the cutting-edge in new apps and features, such as the Google Assistant – have proved a popular option, with Google struggling to keep them in stock even now, months after their launch.

As such, Android enthusiasts are eager to hear what might be coming down the pipeline, and how it might compare to devices like the Galaxy S8, LG G6, and iPhone 8. The Pixel 2 and Pixel 2 XL were already a given. According to some code-digging by German site WinFuture, though, the “taiman” internal codename has cropped up in Google’s AOSP, complete with a connection to the processor it’s expected to use.

It’s not the first time we’ve heard talk of a potential third addition to the Pixel 2 range. Rumors have been circulating for the past couple of months, in fact, after the “taimen” codename surfaced. Like the existing codenames for Pixel 2 – “walleye” and “muskie” – it has a piscine spin, in keeping with Google’s practice of fish-related internal naming.

That’s not just been an odd but charming habit, mind. Google has also used the sizes of the fish it names devices after to indicate the relative size of the phones themselves. Last year, for instance, Pixel’s codename was “sailfish”, a smaller species than the “marlin” codename that the Pixel XL bore.

This year, we have three fish and three different sizes, “taimen” being the largest of the trio. Exactly what screen size that might translate to is unclear: the current Pixel is 5.1-inches, while the Pixel XL is 5.5-inches. Meanwhile, by trimming down its display bezels and switching to a new, narrower aspect ratio, Samsung has managed to squeeze a 6.2-inch Super AMOLED panel into its Galaxy S8+. That’s despite being only a fraction of an inch longer than the Pixel XL.

The stage seems ripe for an even larger Pixel 2 with a bumper display, therefore, and if the dots that are slowly being connected pan out, it could be quite the phone. The Snapdragon 835 is certainly up to the task of a modern flagship, and Google’s strategy of pairing excellent camera sensors with its homegrown algorithms and processing has paid dividends: even today, the Pixel holds its own against the latest phones from Samsung, LG, Apple, and others when it comes to photography. Provide phablet fans with a pocket-friendly, big-screen option as well, and it could help offset Google’s controversial decision not to replace the discontinued Nexus 9 tablet any time soon.

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The Galaxy A8 Is A Tough Sell In The Shroud Of The S8’S Shadow

Samsung introduced the Galaxy A series a few years back. As the company’s first “all metal” smartphones, they were originally designed to be sold in China and compete against the growing competition from the likes of Huawei, Xiaomi, and others that were slowly but surely eroding the Korean conglomerate’s foothold. The following year saw the introduction of glass backs mirroring the Galaxy S6, and past year saw a further refinement that echoed the Galaxy S7. Last month was the official launch of two terrific new offerings, the Galaxy A8 (2024) and the Galaxy A8+ (2024).

The pair of products parallels the Galaxy S8 and S8+ a little too closely design-wise however, and that comes at a cost to the detriment of the devices: Why would anyone want to spend $500+ for an upper mid-range smartphone when they could have the 2023 flagships for around $600 – or less?

Please note that for the sake of brevity, A8 will refer to both the smaller and larger device, unless specifically noted.

Difference between Galaxy A8 and A8 price isn’t much, and that’s a problem

Of course, the Galaxy S8 has been out for many months now. Heck, even the Galaxy Note 8 has been out for months now. Stores all around the globe are slashing prices and even holding BOGO sales to move units and minimize unsold inventory in preparation to the impending announcement of the Galaxy S9, slated to take place in just a few short months. There are units on eBay galore, in used stores and pawnshops, Swappa… and if one can make it to a major marketplace like Hong Kong, there are dozens upon dozens of stores with truly killer prices.

Perhaps the only two unique points going for the Galaxy A8 are the pair of dual front-facing selfie cameras and the new fingerprint sensor placement: under the camera module. Both are nice features, and the former in particular is likely something the younger crowd – whom the A8 is presumably being marketed to – would be interested in. But then again, younger people tend to care about specs and performance, so wouldn’t this group be much more inclined to buy an S8 at a similar price?

‘Galaxy A8 firmware download‘

Then of course, there’s competition outside of the Samsung circle. Much has been made about the OnePlus 5T and its paring of flagship features and components with a starting price around the same point as the A8. The phone also features a bezel-less display as well, thus making it even more compelling, yet instead of the mid-range SoC stuck on Samsung’s smartphone, it goes full throttle with the Qualcomm Snapdragon 835 and double the RAM. Once again: more for the money.

→ Check out: OnePlus 5T vs Nokia 8 vs Galaxy S8

Where does Galaxy A8 stand, then?

At this point, it’s downright confusing as to how Samsung expects the Galaxy A8 to perform. The Korean conglomerate seemingly does not want to accept the fact that its products have become less compelling by way of competition in this range. It’s not that they are bad, or even unworthy of a purchase. But in a country like China where domestic brands like Huawei or Oppo/OnePlus can offer highly competitive creations of their own, there is less and less interest and desire to carry around a Korean-made device.

‘Galaxy A8 Oreo update news‘

Thus, Samsung’s no longer among the top five in China, but elsewhere too, like in India and Europe, devices from OnePlus and Huawei have become people’s favorite. And rightly so, because of the specs, and more importantly, the performance their devices offer. Sure, Samsung’s Galaxy S8 betters the OnePlus 5T in everything (except performance, a tad), so those interested only in Samsung only would rather look at a device like Galaxy S8, than the Galaxy A8, to get something better than what the Chinese OEMs are offering, especially when the difference in price the A8 and the S8 isn’t more than $100 under a deal.

That the Galaxy A8 (2024) has been launched in December isn’t strange given the timing of the series on the whole. What is strange is the product’s pricing. There is not a single feature – save for the pair of front cameras – that is better than the flagship S8, yet Samsung insists on a price point of $500+ Expected, BTW). Because the S8 costs dramatically less than it did back in the Spring, there really is no point in buying a lower-end offering for about the same price. Were the Galaxy A8 were to have been offered for $400 at most, then one might be able to make a case for buying one.

Forget Tesla, Uber Could Emerge As The Biggest Autonomous Vehicle Maker

Uber Eats announced a multiyear partnership with Nuro, one of the country’s leading autonomous vehicle manufacturers. Starting this fall, customers in Texas and California can get their food delivered by driverless robots and skip the tips. The companies plan to expand the service to the San Francisco Bay Area after getting their driverless delivery network up and running. The agreement marks the second autonomous delivery partnership for Uber Eats, which launched a similar service with Motional in Santa Monica, California, this past May. Uber Eats has entered into partnerships with other autonomous vehicle service providers as well.  Uber similarly just expanded a partnership with Motional, a third-party delivery platform, to launch autonomous delivery in Santa Monica, Calif. Under that deal, deliveries will be conducted in Motional’s IONIQ 5 vehicles, which are capable of operating autonomously. These deals highlight Uber’s evolving business strategy since the company sold off its in-house autonomous vehicle program a year ago. Following the pandemic, the market for last-mile autonomous delivery of meals, groceries, and other goods is primed for expansion. The Nuro deal signals a deepening commitment by Uber not just to playing in that space, but also to dominating it. “Nuro and Uber share a vision in which technology can make everyday life just a little bit easier,” said Noah Zych, global head of autonomous mobility and delivery at Uber. “Nuro’s distinctive autonomous vehicles are a great match for the Uber platform, and this partnership will bring a compelling combination of innovation alongside the convenience, affordability and reliability our customers and merchants have come to expect.” Uber’s partnership with Nuro is an expansion of the former’s efforts across autonomous mobility and delivery. The first rollouts will take place in Mountain View and Houston.

Uber Eats announced a multiyear partnership with Nuro, one of the country’s leading autonomous vehicle manufacturers. Starting this fall, customers in Texas and California can get their food delivered by driverless robots and skip the tips. The companies plan to expand the service to the San Francisco Bay Area after getting their driverless delivery network up and running. The agreement marks the second autonomous delivery partnership for Uber Eats, which launched a similar service with Motional in Santa Monica, California, this past May. Uber Eats has entered into partnerships with other autonomous vehicle service providers as well. Uber similarly just expanded a partnership with Motional, a third-party delivery platform, to launch autonomous delivery in Santa Monica, Calif. Under that deal, deliveries will be conducted in Motional’s IONIQ 5 vehicles, which are capable of operating autonomously. These deals highlight Uber’s evolving business strategy since the company sold off its in-house autonomous vehicle program a year ago. Following the pandemic, the market for last-mile autonomous delivery of meals, groceries, and other goods is primed for expansion. The Nuro deal signals a deepening commitment by Uber not just to playing in that space, but also to dominating it. “Nuro and Uber share a vision in which technology can make everyday life just a little bit easier,” said Noah Zych, global head of autonomous mobility and delivery at Uber. “Nuro’s distinctive autonomous vehicles are a great match for the Uber platform, and this partnership will bring a compelling combination of innovation alongside the convenience, affordability and reliability our customers and merchants have come to expect.” Uber’s partnership with Nuro is an expansion of the former’s efforts across autonomous mobility and delivery. The first rollouts will take place in Mountain View and Houston. Such developments with Uber can make it the biggest autonomous vehicle maker surpassing Tesla.

Why Does Type 2 Diabetes Make You Feel So Tired?

The disease of diabetes happens when your blood sugar is excessively high. The term “blood sugar lump” is an alternative designation for blood glucose. The blood sugar level derived from your diet is your primary energy source. Insulin is a hormone produced by the pancreas. It assists in the process of creating energy by allowing carbohydrates from food to get into your cells more quickly. The body occasionally produces too little or no insulin or uses it inefficiently. Following that, glucose continues circulating in your body but does not reach your cells. Over time, too much blood sugar within the body may cause health problems. Although there is no cure or treatment, you can manage it and keep yourself healthy.

As of 2024, 30.3 million Americans, or 9.4% of the population, had diabetes ( Source). One among four Americans was uninformed about his ailment. Diabetes affects one in four persons over 65. 90–95 percent of people with adult diabetes have type 2. A person develops diabetes if his body does not produce enough insulin or has trouble utilizing the glucose produced. High blood sugar is another condition with a similar title, but they are unrelated. Diabetes mellitus is often meant when the word “diabetes” is used.

The typical sugar sold in stores and grocery stores is not glucose. Our cells use glucose, a naturally occurring glucose, as a fuel source. Sucrose, a sugar commonly found in grocery stores, is very distinct from glucose. Berries and fizzy drinks both contain a lot of sugar. Many hormones control the quantity of glucose found in the blood. The brain interacts with one another through substances referred to as hormonal. Insulin is a protein that the pancreas makes. The pancreas produces insulin to connect with other cells every time you eat. The cells are given instructions by this insulin that takes blood sugar.

Types of Diabetes

Do you know how many types of diabetes are there? Here we will discuss about types of diabetes. There are 3 types of Diabetes −

Type 1 Diabetes (Diabetes mellitus)

Type 1 diabetes develops when an individual’s immune system attacks the pancreas, which produces insulin. When the pancreas cannot create insulin, glucose cannot reach the body’s organs, which depend on sugar for survival. An individual who has type 1 diabetes has to inject insulin every day of his life to remain alive. They must often, several times per day, test their sugar levels regularly.

Most often affecting younger individuals, type 1 diabetes can also affect people of all ages, although it is far less frequent. Type-1 diabetes affects around 1 in 10 individuals who have diabetes.

Type 2 diabetes (Diabetes mellitus)

Compared to type 1 diabetes, type 2 diabetes is an entirely different condition. An individual with type 2 diabetes produces insulin, so either it doesn’t function properly in his system or does not produce sufficient insulin to metabolize the sugar. When the pancreas is not working correctly, blood sugar levels (sugar) can reach the body parts that necessitate it.

Diabetes Insipidus − When your body does not have enough ADH or Vasopressin Diabetes Insipidus happens. Hypothalamus produces ADH but pituitary gland stores and releases. It is treatable and need medical attention.

Why does type 2 diabetes make you feel so tired?

Being overweight, having high cholesterol, hypertension, and hyperglycemia are just a few of the founders connected to type 2 diabetes, which is a complicated condition. Psychological issues that can significantly contribute to having “low energy” yet are frequently ignored include sadness, feeling stressed by diagnoses or the intricacy of medical treatment, and anxiety.

Working alongside your medical team to ensure you’re correctly treating your diabetes and other diseases is essential to reduce fatigue and the risk of many problems and complications. This includes adopting good lifestyle decisions. Those who lead healthy lifestyles—exercise daily, eat well, drink enough fluids, and use their prescriptions appropriately- feel good. “The people who commonly start to have issues are the people who slightly bit slow with exercise, or they eat, or may not even eat during the day and then overeat at night, and sometimes neglect their meds.” The most frequent side effects in untreated people are tiredness and headache.

Suppose you have type 2 diabetes and feel exhausted. One sign of the illness is frequently related to fatigue. There are several potential reasons, ranging from fundamental diseases to problems associated with diabetes. Your vitality may occasionally be sapped by just managing your diabetes regularly. You may experience fatigue if your body lacks the energy to carry out its tasks. Your body’s ability to efficiently utilize its primary energy source, sugar, might be compromised by high blood sugar. You could be more likely to experience additional health issues such as renal issues, heart disease, illnesses, and loss of feeling from neuropathic pain, which can all lead to weariness. You can feel worn out while your body struggles to resolve these issues and high glucose levels. Since their bodies must work even harder to do daily tasks when they are obese, individuals routinely experience exhaustion. Being overweight strains your cardiovascular and other systems, leaving you lacking energy.

One common reason for weariness or sluggishness is high or low glucose levels. In both cases, weariness results from an imbalance between a person’s blood sugar levels and the amount or effectiveness of insulin being circulated. Even if you had a restful night’s sleep, having either high or low blood glucose throughout the day may make you tired. Glucose levels rise if insulin is either insufficient (frequently the case with prediabetes) or not operating as it should.

Conclusion

The inability of the body to properly regulate and utilize sugar (glucose) as a fuel source is the root cause of type 2 diabetes. It is a disorder that lasts for a long time (chronic) and causes excessive sugar in the blood. Problems with the heart, the immune system, and anxiety have all been linked to high blood sugar levels. The pancreas cannot produce enough enzymes to regulate the glucose entering the cells. Because of this, the cells become less susceptible to the effects of diabetes, and as a result, they consume less glucose.

Google Pixel 3 Camera Shootout

Manhattan skyline – wide

The P20 Pro has a 3x optical zoom while the iPhone Xs Max, LG V40 and Note 9 all have 2x optical. The Pixels use digital zoom only. As you might expect, the 3x optical zoom on the P20 Pro reveals far more detail on the Empire State Building’s spire and it is the only camera to clearly recreate the horizontal lines on the building at the base of the Empire State. Looking at the 2x optical devices, the Note 9 and iPhone Xs Max are the best up close, producing very similar results. The Note 9 manages slightly better detail and better contrast than the iPhone.

When zooming, the Pixels struggle due to the lack of a secondary lens – but are still comparable to the LG V40 which has a 2x lens.

The Pixels struggle without a secondary lens, but their images are still comparable to the LG V40 (which has one). The Pixel 3 has significantly less noise than the Pixel 2 and resolves more detail, as seen in the glass building at the base of the Empire State. The Pixel 3’s processing starts to wade into P20 Pro territory with artificial sharpness replacing the noisy realism of the Pixel 2. I prefer this approach — less noise and sharper detail — but it likely won’t please fans of previous Pixels. The V40 is again quite muddy with plenty of artifacts surrounding the buildings.

Mural

This colorful mural of Andy Warhol and Jean-Michel Basquiat reveals a lot about how each camera saturates color. Looking at the yellow triangle in the center, the iPhone and Pixels saturate it a lot, while the P20 Pro (with Master AI enabled) sits at the other end of the spectrum. The iPhone and Pixels saturate to the same degree but the Pixel 3 plucks out slightly greater texture on the wall. In terms of realism, I’d say it’s a close race between these three phones. The Note 9 exhibits a metric ton of detail — it’s actually too much — by unrealistically enhancing the edges of every single part of the wall.

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Diner interior

The window is where things get interesting. The Pixel 3 is by far the best here, capturing the most realistic and detailed scene. The Pixel 2 is more blown out and demonstrates far less dynamic range. The P20 Pro is less detailed, but still quite realistic. The iPhone has better clarity but the flat coloring generates a bizarre otherworldly scene. Once again, the V40’s aggressive processing produces a comically bizarre-looking result. The Note 9 is just plain fuzzy.

As for the third factor (the back of the bench), this is a clear way to distinguish dynamic range capabilities. The more detail and better exposed this shaded area is, the more a phone can do to level out exposure in a scene with multiple light levels. The Google Pixel 3 and Pixel 2 are the obvious winners here, with a wider well-exposed area and more texture in the details. The HUAWEI P20 Pro follows with fair quality, but the Samsung Galaxy Note 9, LG V40, and iPhone Xs Max fail miserably. Balancing out the glasses against the window and the bench, the Pixel 3 is the clear winner here.

Evening exterior

At first glance, the street scene at dusk shows just how far low light performance and noise reduction has come. There’s still plenty of light in this scene though and it proves tricky for more than a few of these phones. The P20 Pro does the best job of not blowing out the shop’s interior, though it leans heavily on processing to define features around the neon open sign to the right of the open door. The V40 and Note 9 follow not too far behind. While the Pixel 2, Pixel 3 and iPhone Xs Max all blow out the interior highlights, all three show much greater detail on the shelves inside. The three results are almost indistinguishable up close.

The Note 9 resolves the least detail on the white window ledges at the top of the building and is much darker than the other shots. The V40 doesn’t capture much more detail on the ledges but does lighten up the left side of the building noticeably. The P20 Pro provides marginally better detail, but only the Pixels and the iPhone offered realistic-looking detail, where we can clearly make out the brickwork. The iPhone exhibits less noise in this area, however, and overall comes out on top.

The P20 Pro provides marginally better detail but it isn’t until you get to the Pixels and iPhone that realistic-looking detail is visible.

One more subject I would like to touch on is motion blur. Because these shots are taken in the dark, the shutter speed usually needs to slow down, which might affect the image if there are moving objects or you just happen to have shaky hands. The LG V40 and Samsung Galaxy Note 9 can’t manage freezing the moving cars, for example. This would look cool if done on purpose and the shutter speed was even slower, but it just looks like a mishap here. For these specific photos, much of the detail is lost. This could be simple over-softening, though.

Portrait mode

New building

Fruit and vegetable stand

All six phones did a great job with the produce stand at night, mainly differing in saturation and white balance. Looking at the pickles and tomatoes on the corner, the Pixel 3 does a much better job than the Pixel 2, handling both the highlights on the tomatoes and detail on the pickles better. There’s also a bit less noise. The iPhone handles the highlights well too, but doesn’t get as much detail as the Pixel 3. The V40 is a little soft and washed out, but not terribly so. The Note 9 produces a slightly more lively palette, but lacks details on the pickles. The P20 Pro processes too hard as usual, with too much contrast and no real detail.

Dynamic range is important in night time photography (especially when artificial light is present). With darkness and harsh lights, shadows are tough to deal with. To see performance in this matter just look at that shadow under the shelf above the pickles, right below the watermelon in the center. How much can you see down there?

All six phones did a great job of the fruit and veg stand at night, but I’m giving this one to the Pixel 3.

The HUAWEI P20 Pro’s aggressive approach to crushing blacks performs the worst in this area. The contrast is too high, so the shaded area is almost totally blacked out. The iPhone Xs seems to do pretty well at this, and the Pixel 3 is probably the next best contender. The other phones provide varying degrees of OK.

Looking at the top left corner of the shot, the P20 Pro again crushes the blacks in the hanging flowers and is altogether too contrasty. The Note 9 and Pixel 2 get a little noisy on the white underside of the roof but both offer similar levels of detail. The iPhone displays less noise than the Note 9 or Pixel 2. The V40 does a surprisingly good job in this section, with little noise and good detail, but the contrasty processing lets it down a bit, producing an unrealistic effect under scrutiny. The Pixel 3 produces less noise and more detail than the Pixel 2 in this section and is altogether a more balanced and pleasing result overall. I’m giving this one to the Pixel 3.

Low light bar interior

The bar interior shows just how far smartphone cameras have come in low light situations.

The iPhone struggles to bring out the alcohol bottles on the bottom shelf but is arguably more authentic looking than some. The Pixel 2 lightens things up a bit but is again quite noisy. The Pixel 3 reduces that visible grain and adds a little sharpening for better definition without going overboard. The Note 9 has a natural look in this area, even with the yellowish white balance. However, it can’t produce as much detail as the P20 Pro, which for a change doesn’t overdo the processing. As expected, the V40 does, and ends up looking a little cartoonish. All in all, every phone did great in this very tricky situation but I’m giving this one to the Pixel 3 as well.

Conclusion

The story the images above tell is pretty consistent. For starters, each phone performed very well across a variety of different scenarios, barring perhaps the LG V40. These days you need to really nitpick a flagship phone’s camera to claim it’s significantly better than the rest — they’re all just that good.

Next: Here’s what the Pixel 3’s Night Sight can do

How To Turn Off Or Restart The Google Pixel 7 And Pixel 7 Pro

The Google Pixel 7 and Pixel 7 Pro are incredible flagship smartphones. They are definitely worth considering if you are a fan of the Pixel cameras and the stock Android experience. While they are good phones, you’d find that it is rather convoluted to actually turn off the phone due to decisions that do not make good sense. If you are stuck trying to figure out how to shut down or restart the Google Pixel 7 and Pixel 7 Pro, follow one of the methods listed in this article.

Why can’t you switch off the Pixel 7 by long pressing the power button?

On the Pixel 7 and 7 Pro, you can no longer turn the phone off conventionally by simply pressing down on the power button. Yes, doing so will not switch off the phone anymore, but it will wake up Google Assistant instead. This can be extremely annoying for new users who are used to the more simple power button shut down.

On phones launched with Android 12 and above, manufacturers can choose to wake up the virtual assistant on the device, instead of opening the power menu. If they choose to do so, the manufacturer typically renames the “Power off” button to “Side button” to be in line with this change.

Switch off the Pixel 7 using the button combo

Ryan Haines / Android Authority

To quickly switch off your Google Pixel 7 or 7 Pro, follow these simple steps:

Locate the side button and the volume down button:

The side button is the smaller button above the longer volume button.

The volume button is the long button on the right side of the phone (when the screen is facing you). The volume down button is the lower half of this long button.

Press them together and hold for about 3-5 seconds. This will open up the power menu on your screen.

Remapping the side key to open the power menu

If you’d like to revert to the older behavior where pressing the side key opens the power menu, you can thankfully do so quite easily. Just follow the steps below:

Now, every time you long press the Side key on your Pixel 7, it will open the power menu.

Use the Quick Settings menu

Google includes a power menu shortcut in the Quick Settings menu, which you can use as an alternative if you don’t want to remember the button combination.

Swipe down once on your homescreen to open the notification shade. Swipe down again to open the Quick Settings menu.

In the bottom right corner, you will see a power icon.

Tap the power icon, and it will open the power menu.

Use Google Assistant to turn the phone off

Google Assistant can also invoke the power menu on the Pixel 7 series for you.

Wake Google Assistant by either pressing the Side key, or using the “Hey Google” default wake word.

Say “Turn off my phone,” “Switch off,” or “Restart my phone.”

Force-restart an unresponsive Pixel 7

If your Pixel 7 or Pixel 7 Pro is unresponsive, it would be difficult to initiate any of the above steps. In such a situation, you can force-restart the device.

Locate the side button and the volume down button.

Press them together and hold them for about 15 seconds.

Your phone will give a short vibration, and the display will turn off. This will be followed by the splashscreen and the boot animation, indicating a successful force restart. You will soon boot into your phone’s homescreen as you would on a regular restart.

If force-restarting your phone lands you in a bootloop — i.e. you keep looping back to the splash screen and boot animation repeatedly without reaching the homescreen — then your phone needs further troubleshooting. You can try some of these common Pixel 7 fixes for your problem.

We hope these solutions have helped you learn how you can quickly turn off or restart the Pixel 7. If you just bought one of these for yourself, do check out some recommended cases for the Pixel 7 and some good cases for the Pixel 7 Pro too.

FAQs

The power off button has been renamed to “side key” on the Pixel 7. To power off the device, long press the side key and the volume down button.

You can either choose the Restart option in the power menu or shut down the device and power it up again.

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