Trending March 2024 # Empowering Students Through Multimedia Storytelling # Suggested April 2024 # Top 10 Popular

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By telling their stories through multimedia, students develop skills in critical thinking, writing, research, and collaboration, as well as owning their learning and effecting change.

Perceptions of people and events are very much dependent upon who you are and what your experience has been. Events in Ferguson and Baltimore, among others, highlight our misunderstandings of each other, and how the same facts can be interpreted entirely differently. What’s worse, people of color and underrepresented groups are defined by journalists covering these events, who themselves don’t reflect the ethnic composition of our country as a whole.

Recent studies have proven that stories can change perceptions and even make people more tolerant. Rather than wait to be defined by others, it’s important that students learn to create understanding by sharing their story, their worldview, their concerns, and their triumphs with others.

Groups like Youth Radio and Cause Beautiful are empowering teens in poor and minority-majority neighborhoods to become multimedia journalists. Kids in these programs learn how to tell and share their own stories with a local or national audience.

No matter your class demographics or grade level, ELA and social studies teachers should integrate similar projects in their own classrooms, because every student will benefit from learning to craft a compelling visual story backed by persuasive facts and ideas.

What Is Multimedia Storytelling?

Students use video, audio, photography, web, and social media to craft documentaries and nonfiction stories about the world around them. These interdisciplinary projects allow students to focus on creating an authentic product that many people outside the classroom and their neighborhoods will see.

Why Produce Multimedia Stories?

Multimedia storytelling is a perfect match for Common Core curriculum, so we can finally feel confident about integrating it into our classes. There are many benefits to these kinds of projects.

Producing these stories develops critical thinking and writing skills.

Digging up information about a topic and people to interview hones research skills.

Reporting and conducting interviews helps develop public speaking and interpersonal skills.

Allowing students to choose topics they’re passionate about allows them to take ownership of their learning.

Considering other perspectives and your work’s impact on an audience helps address ethical decision making.

Producing the videos develops collaboration and time-management skills.

Stories can actually have an impact on students’ communities and effect change.

How to Do It

Mobile devices make it possible to author and share video stories and documentaries with a global audience, and to have an impact on society. Most students have access to a smartphone or tablet, and many tools for authoring video and social media stories are free. There are even some free lesson plans for multimedia journalism, video, and photography that teachers can use to empower students right away.

Begin by having a discussion with your students about misperceptions that outsiders might have about their community and themselves. Then flip it and consider what misperceptions your students have about others. This is a great opportunity to find out how and why we end up with the wrong idea about others.

Make a list of all the good things about your school or neighborhood that outsiders don’t know about.

Make a list of all of the bad things about your school or neighborhood that need to be fixed or changed.

Working individually or in teams, have students choose one of the items from either list as the subject of their project.

Determine the medium you’d like your students to use: video documentaries, audio podcasts or stories, text, social media, etc.

Producing Your Stories

Audio documentaries are easy to do with services like Soundcloud and the new Story Corps app. Many of the same techniques apply to video documentaries, so it might be helpful to begin with audio and move to video.

Making video documentaries is complex and takes a lot of time, so scaffold the projects to make the process enjoyable, and you’ll end up with a product the students can be proud of. Begin with class exercises and learn from mistakes before you go out into the real world.

Steps in the Process:

Conduct research and identify people to interview.

Develop questions for these sources and practice interview skills.

Start with an interview-only project to learn which questions give the most interesting responses.

Shoot B-roll footage that illustrates what your interviewees are talking about as they lead their lives, work, or interact with others.

Through editing, combine the interviews with B-roll.

Repeat.

Publishing Your Stories

Audio stories can be hosted for free on Soundcloud, and hosted automatically if you conducted interviews using the StoryCorps app. Video projects are best when hosted on YouTube and Vimeo, although many schools block these sites from their networks. Consider creating a teacher account on these sites so that you can upload student work separately.

Storehouse is a great app that allows you to combine video, photos and text in an interactive gallery viewable on any web browser, so this might be a good solution if you have limited access to video hosting sites.

Social media is also a great way to publish and share your completed work. Share links via Twitter, Facebook, Pinterest, or your favorite network. The projects have an impact only if others see them, so publicize and let parents and community members see their stories.

General Tips

Ideas are the most important part, so spend time developing unique, narrow topics.

Find colorful interview subjects with unique points of view.

Writing is the core skill of any multimedia project, including interview questions, story structure, and voice overs.

Less is more. Keep the projects short and to the point, or you run the risk of being overwhelmed with information and video footage.

Develop community buy-in. Get your administrators excited about empowering students. Encourage neighborhood leaders to participate in projects that will get their message heard by others.

Embrace your mistakes. There will be plenty of them, so learn from each one and make the next project better. Just attempting these projects has already made the world a better place.

Multimedia stories are fun challenges for your students and empower them to share their ideas and concerns with the wider world. We owe them the opportunity to become multimedia literate and to develop the courage it takes to have an impact on society.

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Empowering First Gen Students To Be Leaders

Empowering First Gen Students to Be Leaders A conversation with Leaders-in-Training’s Erica Mosca (CGS’06, COM’08)

They are BU alumni, faculty, and staff—of every race, ethnicity, age, and gender—and they are “Opening Doors” for the next generation.

Erica Mosca is a first-generation college graduate. Her father was born in the Philippines, her mother is Filipino American, and Mosca was born and raised in California. Her parents struggled to pay the bills on minimum wage paychecks, with Mosca helping out by juggling two jobs all through high school.

Mosca (CGS’06, COM’08) is the founding executive director of Leaders in Training (LIT), a Las Vegas–based nonprofit that empowers first-generation students to get into college—and graduate—and become leaders in their communities.  

After graduating summa cum laude from BU—and winning induction into the Scarlet Key Society, the University’s highest honor for a student leader—she joined Teach for America and spent two years teaching fifth grade in the East Las Vegas neighborhood. She then earned a master’s in education from the University of Nevada, Las Vegas, and a master’s in policy and management at the Harvard Graduate School of Education. Returning to Las Vegas from Cambridge in 2011, she worked for a year as a consultant in the Clark County District school superintendent’s office.

In 2012, Mosca scraped together $2,000 she’d saved and founded Leaders in Training, in a trailer at the elementary school where she used to teach.

Today LIT has five paid staff (Mosca is the only one who’s full-time) and an office suite in a strip mall. Her team offers its students free tutoring, mentoring, SAT prep, help navigating college admissions—and college itself—and workshops ranging from educational inequities to leadership skills. LIT has 130 students; 48 have graduated from high school and of those, 46 are in college. “One is in the Navy, one is out of school,” Mosca says. “We’re working to get him back.”

BU Today spoke with Mosca recently about her years at BU, why she started LIT, and how it helps the students it serves.

BU Today: What was your experience like at BU as a first-generation student?

Mosca: For me, going to BU was getting on a red-eye from California with two pieces of luggage. One suitcase got stolen at the airport. I was 18, I didn’t know you were supposed to go to baggage claim right away, so I stopped at Burger King for breakfast first. Now, it’s funny, right?

I figured out how to take the T, and I got to 575 Commonwealth Avenue [the dorm]. The security guard’s name was Ken. He looked confused as to why I was moving myself in alone, but he was really nice. Then I see my roommate—who was awesome and we ended up being best friends; her father was a graduate of MIT and he was literally building her an ethernet cord because there was no Wi-Fi.

In California, integration is the norm. I remember the culture shock of everything feeling very segregated and not diverse. I got very active at BU, and I found my people. My closest friend, Paloma Martinez (CAS’08, COM’08), was Latino. She’s a documentary filmmaker in San Francisco now.

At first I didn’t even know if I was meant to be at BU. But I got a really good GPA that fall—I was always studying—and then I thought, okay, I can be here.

I probably wouldn’t have stayed at BU without the College of General Studies. The staff really cared about me. Dean [associate dean for student academic life] [Stacy] Godnick recommended Teach for America to me when I was a sophomore. James Wilcox, [a CGS associate professor emeritus of humanities], was the founding funder of LIT. When I graduated from Harvard, he took me to dinner and gave me a check for $500.

I think I succeeded at BU because I found my support system, and not just with a diverse group who got it.

Did you experience any subtle forms of intolerance at BU?

For me, it was more about classism—little things. I worked in the dining hall. I used to wear the hat and I was serving my fellow classmates food, but I was also competing against them for grades. I felt so demeaned.

How did you handle things like that?

I remembered my parents and some tough experiences growing up—being on food stamps, being evicted. I knew that at BU I was living a privileged life in a bubble on Commonwealth Avenue. I wasn’t working at a minimum wage job like so many other people in my family. I knew why I was in college—so I could help my family and other people. I took that very seriously. It didn’t matter that I had to serve other people food.

“A lot of first-generation students don’t want to go to college because they want to work and help their parents now. They feel like it’s their responsibility.”

Why did you get into this work?

People tell you the world is equal. I believed that. Then when I got to BU, I saw that wasn’t true. There were people who had SAT classes in their high schools, who went to boarding schools where the counselor-to-student ratio was 1:25.

When Teach for America sent me to Las Vegas, that’s when I began to really understand why there are gaps and inequities. Nevada is consistently ranked lowest in the United States in terms of public education.

I went in front of these 10-year-olds and I told them that if they worked hard, they’d get to college and they would make it. They were eighth graders when I came back, and I saw that the system wasn’t going to make that dream come true. They were getting the short end of the stick. They were in schools with fewer teachers and resources. I had lied to them. I felt so lucky to have gone to college. I wanted to help other people do that. If students and families are offered equitable opportunities, they can rise.

Can you talk a little about your early education?

We moved a lot when I was growing up. I went to four or five different elementary schools. I was always a high flyer at school, but when I was 16 we moved to Novato, Calif., and I went to the high school there. Suddenly I was struggling. It was my first experience with educational inequity. The other schools I’d gone to were more working-class. Novato was middle class/upper class. It was a more competitive school. I worked really hard and I figured it out. I don’t think I would’ve gotten into BU if I hadn’t gone to Novato.

It also helped that I did a nonprofit college access program. It was about exposure—they took you to colleges; I had a college mentor.

I get that my entire experience is an “only-in-America” story. My dad lived in the Philippines, in a village with no electricity or regular running water. In one generation, his daughter has a master’s degree from Harvard. That’s an American story, but it’s such an exception. That’s what we’re trying to change.

What are some of the barriers your students face?

A lot of first-generation students don’t want to go to college because they want to work and help their parents now. They feel like it’s their responsibility.

We’re still trying to prove that our kids can do it—that it’s possible. East Las Vegas is very diverse. But it’s still a place where, if you’re Latino and you go to school, you get stereotyped that you’re going to be a maid or a valet.

How does your background help you in your work?

I actually experienced all these things that we’re trying to change. I can go into a boardroom filled with rich white men and pitch to them, and that night I can go to a cookout with our families. I’m very grounded in the community. I feel more comfortable there than I do in the boardroom, but I can play both roles. I call it a beautiful burden. You play the game to change the game.

Do they accept you in the boardrooms?

They do now.

What is your biggest challenge now?

I’m struggling to get resources for our kids. I don’t have big-name board members. I’m not independently wealthy. If people understood equity from all sides, they would give us money. I’m the kid they wanted to help a decade ago, two decades ago—and look what I did.

Do you know BU alumni, faculty, and staff who are opening doors or breaking barriers themselves? Email Cindy Buccini at [email protected] and recommend them for our series “Opening Doors.”

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Transforming Enterprise Data Through Crowdsourcing

To establish a baseline of consistent data quality, many companies use a Center of Excellence model for information governance with a small group of stakeholders; however new technologies allow for more modern approaches by leveraging machine learning and AI capabilities. The result? The rise of crowdsourced information governance — empowering a company’s hundreds or thousands of business users to collectively improve the value of overall corporate data — and using it as key driver for business transformation.

Leverage Organization-Wide Tribal Knowledge

As large organizations have thousands of possible business data contributors throughout their various departments worldwide, the potential for capturing the value of individuals’ tribal knowledge is immense. By first establishing a centralized information governance initiative with standardized processes, data processes, definitions and rules, companies are streamlining the way all members of their organizations interact with and curate data across various systems and departments.

Once all business users are speaking the same data language, savvy organizations can take this foundation of information governance to the next level by applying machine learning. The result is a “synthetic consultant” – an algorithm that synthesizes and curates business users’ collective knowledge and data best practices to help an organization establish and benefit from repeatable processes that build on its resources’ ever-evolving knowledge bases. Applying crowdsourced automation also allows organizations to improve their ability to scale data management best practices and ensure corporate data is reliable and up to date across all departments. This generates a reliable and validated body of corporate data that can be trusted to inform better business decisions and outcomes.

Create World-Class Crowdsourced Information Governance

Establishing a world-class crowdsourced information governance initiative requires a dedicated effort and targeted business processes across an organization. This includes establishing a baseline community of interest within the organization that aligns with business goals and setting proper information governance policies and enforcement to drive intended results across the organization. It also means setting up processes for identifying data errors, assigning ownership to relevant business data owners, and establishing effective and rapid remediation procedures.

Once the internal community of interest is established, organizations may wish to expand their crowdsourced efforts by incorporating the deep guidance realized from other companies in similar industries. For example, if an organization specializes in the finance and banking industry, it will be required to adhere to numerous IFRS and GAAP regulations. With a crowdsourced information governance initiative that connects into aggregate data libraries from similar organizations and perhaps even third-party industry experts, companies can more effectively stay in the loop on the latest industry challenges and regulations by loading specific industry policies, benchmarks and rules into their machine learning environment.

Ultimately companies that take a crowdsourced approach to information governance are able to utilize the collective knowledge of their business data contributors to elevate the impact of their organizations’ business transformations. Rather than approaching business transformation from a siloed, department-specific view, these organizations are successfully employing automation to plug business users into the transformation effort and give them a real stake in its long-term success.

About the author:

Rex Ahlstrom, Chief Strategy and Technology Officer, BackOffice Associates

How To Ace Your Content Marketing Game With Storytelling

Stories are extremely effective at building trust. This is why businesses are using influencer marketing

Stories are a great way of appealing to and connecting with people. They’re extremely effective at building trust. Think about every time you consider customer reviews before buying a product – the stories of real people and their experiences are what truly encourages you to buy it. This is why businesses are using influencer marketing.  

A study by Twitter found that tweets from influencers coupled with tweets from brands can increase purchase intent by 5.2 times. In fact, 40% of the respondents in the study reported having purchased products based directly on an influencer’s recommendation. 

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This guide helps you explore the fundamentals of developing powerful authentic brand stories.

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So, the big question is – is storytelling the future of content marketing? In this post, we’ll explore the significance of storytelling in B2B content marketing. We’ll also look at some surefire ways of boosting your B2B content strategy using storytelling. 

The power of storytelling

Let’s have a quick look at the benefits of storytelling as a B2B marketing strategy. 

1. Stories build trust and relationships

When you share authentic stories about your brand, you can connect with your audiences on a deeper level. Businesses have started to look beyond your brand – they look for stories that resonate with them as people. Such people are not only more likely to buy from you but also spread positive word-of-mouth about your brand.  

Consider, for example, one of the leaders in CRM solutions, Salesforce. This brand realizes the importance of a good story to boost trust and credibility. It leverages its happy customers for storytelling.  

Salesforce has a separate section on its website entirely dedicated to the success stories of its customers. When its prospects read such stories, it naturally instills trust in Salesforce’s solutions.   

2. Stories are great motivators

A good story can be a great motivator to drive your audiences toward becoming customers. Many B2B brands have been successfully using this tactic to sell their services or products.  

For example, the shipping conglomerate, Maersk, realizes how important it is to motivate its audiences. This is possible only through stories that are real and relatable. Its campaign, “The Heart of Trade” revolves entirely around the lives of people who make trade happen.  

Through this campaign, it showcased the lives of the everyday entrepreneurs – the heroes of global trade. Such stories are greatly inspirational and can help to win the hearts of your prospects.  

3. Stories are fun and exciting

Well of course they are! When you simply state your amazing product’s features, trust me, no one has the slightest bit of interest in them. But, turn them into a story about how they can benefit your audiences and they’ll start listening.  

Law firm, BLP, offers risk management consulting services to well-known financial institutions. For one of its marketing campaigns, it created a series of videos inspired by Ocean’s 11 in a classic “heist” theme. Their objective was to be top of mind for potential buyers. 

These videos spoke about caution using real-life regulatory scenarios that can become a nightmare for firms. The videos are fun to watch, engrossing and extremely compelling.   

How to use storytelling effectively

Now that you understand the benefits of storytelling, let’s look at a few ways in which you can use this for B2B marketing.  

An interesting strategy that has been used by many B2B brands is to leverage employees to share brand stories. Your employees are the ones who know your products the best because they’re the ones who create them. So getting them to spread your story in their circles can be a great way to increase awareness of your brand.  

IBM is a company that has been using this tactic successfully for a long time. It created an internal hub that makes it easy for its employees to share content on their social networks. The employees who participate in the program are recognized for their efforts. This isn’t an absolute necessity, however. 

Of course, IBM is able to leverage its in-house platform given its technical proficiency and immense resources. For those of us who don’t have such resources at our disposal, platforms like Smarp can be really helpful.  

This second use case can be a serious game-changer for marketers seeking to maximize the authenticity of their storytelling. By simply posting an internal-only discussion thread, you can easily spark conversations with non-marketers in your company – sales reps, customer success agents and others who intimately know the issues that your buyer personas face day in, day out and can help inform the content you work on. 

Tip: Make the process easy and seamless, allowing subject matter experts to share their wisdom via web forms, audio files – whatever fits their lives best. And make sure to offer incentives for participation. This will encourage your employees to contribute and get your stories heard in their circles.  

2. Involve customers in your journey

If you truly want to resonate with your audiences and infuse yourself into their lives and conversations – involve them in every step of your journey. Share stories about how you started out, what your vision is now and your plans for the future.  

By involving your customers in every step of your journey, you are no longer limited to just a product or service. Through your stories, they’ll get to see the human side of your brand and this can truly help you win their trust.  

Workday, for instance, uses its social media profiles mainly to give its audience an inside look at the company to show its human side.   

This speaks volumes about the culture and values of the company because it was founded on the idea of putting people at the center of enterprise software.  

Tip: Identify the challenges of your target audiences and help them overcome these through storytelling. Resonate with their issues as this will make your brand appear more credible and human.  

3. Leverage influencers to share your stories

Influencers are expert storytellers. So collaborate with influencers in your niche and have them present your story to their followers. Make sure not to meddle too much with the actual content creation process as this can do you more harm. 

Provide your influencers with ample creative freedom while making sure you’ve clearly articulated your expectations. Studies have found that 77% of influencers prefer to collaborate with brands that provide creative freedom.  

Microsoft launched a unique campaign on the occasion of International Women’s Day 2023. Its objective was to increase awareness and motivate more women to work in science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) disciplines. 

The results were phenomenal. These photos recorded a total of 3.5 million likes and reached around 91 million people.  

This is a great way of positioning your brand in front of your target audiences. When they get to hear such authentic stories from influencers, they’re more likely to buy your product. The amount of engagement the above post has generated is a good indication of that.  

Apart from posting sponsored content on social media, influential bloggers can also help you get your stories across to your target audiences. A great way of engaging them is to ask them to write product reviews for you on their blogs. Not only can they boost your content strategy, but also help improve your SEO as well.  

BuzzSumo can help you find the right influencers for your brand. It allows you to filter the results by domain authority, relevance, retweet ratio, reply ratio and other parameters. You can even filter the results to display influencers by type – whether you need bloggers, journalists, regular people or even companies.  

Tip: Collaborate with influencers to get your stories across to your target audiences in a way that’s authentic, aesthetic and relatable.  

Final thoughts

The world around us continues to evolve every single day. With it, there are shifts in consumer preferences and hence the need for brands to constantly innovate. However, our basic human instincts have remained the same and always will. We are hardwired for stories. So follow the above-mentioned methods and use the power of storytelling to take your business places. 

Shane Barker is a digital marketing consultant for 15 years with an emphasis on Influencer Marketing in the last 5 years. He is specialized in sales funnels, targeted traffic and website conversions. He has consulted with Fortune 500 companies, Influencers with digital products, and a number of A-List celebrities.

Students Witness History, Report Back

Ten days into their first semester as reporters for BU’s Washington, D.C., Journalism Program, students got the reporting opportunity of a lifetime: covering President Barack Obama’s inauguration on January 20.

The program, founded in 2000 by Washington Center director Linda Killian (CAS’80, COM’80), a former editor at National Public Radio’s All Things Considered, offers graduate and undergraduate students a semester-long opportunity to work in the bureaus of national news organizations such as ABC, NBC, the Boston Globe, and NPR, as well as New England news outlets like the Cape Cod Times, the Worcester Telegram and Gazette, and Connecticut Public Radio.

Last week, the students headed out early on inauguration day to capture the nation’s capital at this moment in history. They reflected on the experience for BU Today.

Despite the cold, the stress of finding New Hampshire residents to interview, and the long, long walk home through massive crowds, it was worth it to witness such a historic moment surrounded by hundreds of thousands of excited people. As a journalism and political science student, it was incredible to see so many people motivated by the political process; as a human being, it was incredible to see so many people treat each other with respect and patience in a crowd that could have easily become unruly.

Every moment — from the traditional playing of “Hail to the Chief” following the swearing-in to the chant “Nah nah nah nah, good-bye!” that rose from the crowd, directed at the outgoing president — will stay with me for a lifetime. (Not to mention the man who walked across a row of Porta-Potties to beat the crowd!)

The cold was unbearable, the walking was painful, the crowds and crushing were frightening — but none of this mattered once Obama stepped onto the platform. He spoke with such confidence, belief, and optimism for the future that one had to feel this was going to be a time of change.

I trusted Obama, believing that he would deliver positive change. I admired his family for their unity, their teamwork, and their values.

Never in my life have I seen so many politically engaged people gathered in one city so peacefully, civilized and in common agreement that this was a great day, this was a special day, but most importantly, this was a new day and a new era for Americans.

I spent most of the day literally covering the event from the sidelines — not just because of the biting winds, but because there was nowhere to go. Most of the action was at the edges of the crowds, where people paced back and forth looking for easy entrances.

Despite endless lines, dangerously crowded trains, and masses of people from all 50 states pressed cheek by jowl next to total strangers, there were no arrests or reports of violence. I saw faces of eagerness, impatience, and weariness, but not one of anger, even if the hassles some tourists suffered really justified it. The event was a powerful argument that American people are basically decent, and I was glad to be a witness to it.

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Smarter Ai Through Quantum, Neuromorphic, And High

Achieving a smarter version of AI through Quantum computing, Neuromorphic computing, and High-performance computing.

The current AI and Deep Learning of the present era have a few shortcomings like training a deep net can be very time-consuming, cloud computing can be costly and unavailability of sufficient data can also be a problem. To be rid of these, the scientists are all set in their search for a smarter version of AI, and there seem to be three ways they can progress in the future.  

High-Performance Computing (HPC)

Within the process of improving AI, the most focus is on high-performance computing. It is based on the deep neural net but aims to make them faster and easier to access. It aims to provide better general-purpose environments like TensorFlow, and greater utilization of GPUs and FPGAs in larger and larger data centers, with the promise of even more specialized chips not too far away.  The key drivers here address at least two of the three impediments to progress.  These improvements will make it faster and easier to program for more reliably good results, and faster chips in particular should make the raw machine compute time shorter. The point of having a high-performance computer is so that the individual nodes can work together to solve a problem larger than any one computer can easily solve. And, just like people, the nodes need to be able to talk to one another in order to work meaningfully together. Of course, computers talk to each other over networks, and there is a variety of computer network (or interconnect) options available for the business clusters.  

Neuromorphic Computing

Neuromorphic computing began as the pursuit of using analog circuits to mimic the synaptic structures found in brains. The brain excels at picking out patterns from noise and learning. A neuromorphic CPU excels at processing discrete, clear data. many believe neuromorphic computing can unlock applications and solve large-scale problems that have stymied conventional computing systems for decades. In 2008, the U.S. Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) launched a program called Systems of Neuromorphic Adaptive Plastic Scalable Electronics, or SyNAPSE, “to develop low-power electronic neuromorphic computers that scale to biological levels.” The project’s first phase was to develop nanometer-scale synapses that mimicked synapse activity in the brain but would function in a microcircuit-based architecture. Intel Labs set to work on its own lines of neuromorphic inquiry in 2011. While working through a series of acquisitions around AI processing, Intel made a critical talent hire in Narayan Srinivasa, who came aboard in early 2024 as Intel Labs’ chief scientist and senior principal engineer for neuromorphic computing.  

Quantum Computing

The current AI and Deep Learning of the present era have a few shortcomings like training a deep net can be very time-consuming, cloud computing can be costly and unavailability of sufficient data can also be a problem. To be rid of these, the scientists are all set in their search for a smarter version of AI, and there seem to be three ways they can progress in the future.Within the process of improving AI, the most focus is on high-performance computing. It is based on the deep neural net but aims to make them faster and easier to access. It aims to provide better general-purpose environments like TensorFlow, and greater utilization of GPUs and FPGAs in larger and larger data centers, with the promise of even more specialized chips not too far away. The key drivers here address at least two of the three impediments to progress. These improvements will make it faster and easier to program for more reliably good results, and faster chips in particular should make the raw machine compute time shorter. The point of having a high-performance computer is so that the individual nodes can work together to solve a problem larger than any one computer can easily solve. And, just like people, the nodes need to be able to talk to one another in order to work meaningfully together. Of course, computers talk to each other over networks, and there is a variety of computer network (or interconnect) options available for the business clusters.Neuromorphic computing began as the pursuit of using analog circuits to mimic the synaptic structures found in brains. The brain excels at picking out patterns from noise and learning. A neuromorphic CPU excels at processing discrete, clear data. many believe neuromorphic computing can unlock applications and solve large-scale problems that have stymied conventional computing systems for decades. In 2008, the U.S. Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) launched a program called Systems of Neuromorphic Adaptive Plastic Scalable Electronics, or SyNAPSE, “to develop low-power electronic neuromorphic computers that scale to biological levels.” The project’s first phase was to develop nanometer-scale synapses that mimicked synapse activity in the brain but would function in a microcircuit-based architecture. Intel Labs set to work on its own lines of neuromorphic inquiry in 2011. While working through a series of acquisitions around AI processing, Intel made a critical talent hire in Narayan Srinivasa, who came aboard in early 2024 as Intel Labs’ chief scientist and senior principal engineer for neuromorphic chúng tôi quantum computing, operations instead use the quantum state of an object to produce what’s known as a qubit. These states are the undefined properties of an object before they’ve been detected, such as the spin of an electron or the polarization of a photon. Rather than having a clear position, unmeasured quantum states occur in a mixed ‘superposition’, like a coin spinning through the air before landing. These superpositions can be entangled with those of other objects, meaning their final outcomes will be mathematically related even if they are unknown. Qubits can represent numerous possible combinations of 1 and 0 at the same time. This ability to simultaneously be in multiple states is called superposition. To put qubits into superposition, researchers manipulate them using precision lasers or microwave beams. With the help of this counterintuitive phenomenon, a quantum computer with several qubits in superposition can crunch through a vast number of potential outcomes simultaneously. The final result of a calculation emerges only once the qubits are measured, which immediately causes their quantum state to “collapse” to either 1 or 0.

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