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Introduction to Keras OCR

Keras OCR provides out-of-the-box OCR models and will define an end-to-end pipeline for building new OCR models. The OCR acronym stands for optical character recognition, also known as text recognition. It is a popular technique for extracting text from a specific image. An OCR program is a program that extracts and repurposes data from scanned documents and camera images.

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Key Takeaways

The keras ocr system will use a hardware combination, such as an optical scanner and software capable of image processing.

Optical character recognition is used to identify and digitize the numerical and alphabetical characters presented in the image.

What is Keras OCR?

For text extraction, OCR tools use multiple machine algorithms for pattern recognition to determine the layout and presence of text image files. This tool is trained to recognize characters, shapes, and numbers to recognize image text.

How to Use Keras OCR?

1. In the first step, we check the Installation of keras by importing the same module using the following import keyword.

Code:

import keras_ocr

Output:

Code:

import keras_ocr import matplotlib.pyplot as plt

Output:

3. We train the weight detector After importing all the modules in this step.

Code:

keras_pipeline = keras_ocr.pipeline.Pipeline()

Output:

4. After defining the weight detector now, in this step, we are using images for testing the capability.

Code:

img = [ ]

Output:

5. After loading the images in this step, we use a pipeline recognizer on the image for making the predictions.

Code:

pred = keras_pipeline.recognize (img)

Output:

6. After running the pipeline recognizer, we are now plotting the model predictions in this step.

Code:

fig, axs = plt.subplots(nrows = len(img), figsize = (10, 20)) for ax, image, predictions in zip (axs, img, pred): keras_ocr.tools.drawAnnotations(image = image, predictions = predictions, ax = ax)

Output:

7. After defining the image in the below steps, we print the text from an image.

Code:

pred_img = pred[1] for text, box in pred_img: print (text)

Output:

How to Use Text Extraction in Keras OCR?

Text extraction is possible by importing the OCR module. We can extract the text from an image as shown below; we can see that we are extracting the text from the Test2 image.

import keras_ocr import matplotlib.pyplot as plt ocr_keras = keras_ocr.pipeline.Pipeline() ocr_img_keras = [ ] ocr_pred = ocr_keras.recognize (ocr_img_keras) fig, axs = plt.subplots(nrows=len(ocr_img_keras), figsize=(10, 20)) for ax, image, predictions in zip(axs, ocr_img_keras, ocr_pred): keras_ocr.tools.drawAnnotations(image=image, predictions=predictions, ax=ax) ocr_img = ocr_pred [1] for text, box in ocr_img: print(text)

Output:

In the below example, we are using a single image to extract the text from an image. We are using a test image for the same.

Code:

import keras_ocr import matplotlib.pyplot as plt ocr_keras = keras_ocr.pipeline.Pipeline() ocr_img_keras = [ ] ocr_pred = ocr_keras.recognize(ocr_img_keras) fig, axs = plt.subplots(nrows=len(ocr_img_keras), figsize=(10, 20)) for ax, image, predictions in zip(axs, ocr_img_keras, ocr_pred): keras_ocr.tools.drawAnnotations(image=image, predictions=predictions, ax=ax) ocr_img = ocr_pred [1] for text, box in ocr_img: print(text)

Output:

Installing the Keras OCR

We are installing using the pip command. To install it, we must install the same using the pip install command. In the below example, we are installing it on the Ubuntu system.

Code:

python3 -m pip install keras-ocr

Output:

In the above example, we can see that installing it also installs the required packages. To validate the Installation, we need to import the package of ocr. We are importing the ocr module by using the import command as follows.

Code:

import keras_ocr

Output:

Keras OCR Models

Keras ocr defines the ocr models. In the below example, we are defining the pretrained model as follows. We can see that we have imported the required model for the models.

Code:

import os ….. import sklearn.model_selection import tensorflow as tf import keras_ocr keras_dataset = keras_ocr.datasets.get_icdar_2013_detector_dataset( cache_dir = '.', skip_illegible = False ) train, validation = sklearn.model_selection.train_test_split( keras_dataset, train_size = 0.7, random_state = 42 ) augm = imgaug.augmenters.Sequential([ imgaug.augmenters.Affine( scale = (1.0, 1.2), rotate = (-5, 5) ), imgaug.augmenters.GaussianBlur(sigma = (0, 0.7)), imgaug.augmenters.Multiply((0.5, 1.7), per_channel = 0.3) ]) tig = keras_ocr.datasets.get_detector_image_generator( labels = train, width = 10, height = 10 ) vig = keras_ocr.datasets.get_detector_image_generator( labels = validation, width = 10, height = 10 ) img, keras_line, confidence = next(tig) keras_plt = keras_ocr.tools.drawBoxes(image = img, boxes = keras_line, boxes_format = 'lines') plt.imshow(keras_plt)

Output:

In the example below, we define the keras pretrained model as follows. We are importing the keras model.

Code:

import matplotlib.pyplot as plt import keras_ocr pip_ocr = keras_ocr.pipeline.Pipeline() img = [ keras_ocr.tools.read(url) for url in [ 'Test.JPG'] ] pred = pip_ocr.recognize (img) fig, axs = plt.subplots(nrows=len(img), figsize=(20, 20)) for ax, image, predictions in zip(axs, img, pred): keras_ocr.tools.drawAnnotations(image=image, predictions=predictions, ax=ax)

Output:

Keras OCR Program

In the below example, we are importing the OCR and matplotlib library. We are extracting the text from the image using the chúng tôi image.

Code:

import matplotlib.pyplot as plt import keras_ocr ocr_keras = keras_ocr.pipeline.Pipeline() img_ocr = [ keras_ocr.tools.read(img_ocr) for img_ocr in ['Test.JPG', 'Test.JPG',] ] predict = ocr_keras.recognize(img_ocr) fig, axs = plt.subplots(nrows=len(img_ocr), figsize=(10, 20)) for ax, image, predictions in zip(axs, img_ocr, predict): keras_ocr.tools.drawAnnotations(image=image, predictions=predictions, ax=ax) img = predict [1] for keras_text, box in img: print(keras_text)

Output:

FAQ

Given below are the FAQs mentioned:

Q1. What is the use of Keras ocr?

Answer: It extracts the text from the image we used in the code. We extracted all of the code from the images that we used.

Q2. Which libraries do we need to import while using Keras ocr?

Answer: We need to import the keras_ocr and matplotlib library. We are importing libraries by using the import keywords.

Q3. What is text extraction in Keras ocr?

Answer: Text extraction is simply extracting text from an image using the keras ocr code.

Conclusion

It provides out-of-the-box OCR models and will define an end-to-end pipeline to build new OCR models. OCR converts digital data into image format into editable Word by processing documents.

Recommended Articles

This is a guide to Keras OCR. Here we discuss the introduction, and how to use it, Installation, models, and programs. You may also have a look at the following articles to learn more –

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Using Text Shortcuts On Mac

Previously, we have shown you how to use text shortcuts on your iOS device for quick and efficient type. The same feature is also available on OS X which allows you to use small “phrases” or “a bunch of letters” as a replacement for a larger phrase that’s automatically entered when you type in the shortcut. In this article, we’ll be showing you how to set up text shortcuts on Mac, along with how to save and restore any text shortcut settings you have.

Setting up text shortcuts on Mac

To setup text shortcuts, follow the steps detailed below:

3. Here you’ll see two main columns, “Replace” and “With.”

The string of text or phrase you want to use as a shortcut will be entered in the Replace column. For example, if you want to use “brb” as a shortcut for “Be Right Back,” enter in “brb” in the Replace column.

And “Be Right Back” in the With column.

Similarly, apart from common shortcuts to use in your composing, you can use initials in the Replace column to replace a full name or address that you’ll enter in the With column.

You also have the options to use smart quotes and dashes and select the apostrophe type for double and single quotes. It’s quite useful, if you’re into that sort of thing.

Once you have all your text shortcuts set up, you’ll notice that any time you type a shortcut into various apps such as Notes, OS X will automatically expand into the full word or phrase.

Saving/Backup Text Shortcuts on Your Mac:

If you use multiple Macs in your workflow, or would like to have the exact same shortcuts on your work computer as you have at home, you can also back up the Text Shortcuts and use it on another Mac.

In the same window, select any one of the entries in the columns, and press “Command + A” on your keyboard. All entries will be selected, as shown below:

Drag and drop these entries on your Desktop.

You’ll notice that OS X will create a new file named “Text Substitutions.plist.” This property list file contains all of your text shortcuts in a single file.

Restoring Text Shortcuts On The Same / Another Mac

You’ll see all your text shortcuts automatically added to your Mac.

So that’s quite an effective way to save time / manage your efficiency while composing or messaging someone on your Mac, whether it’s a document, email, or whatsoever.

Do let us know as always in the Comments below if you have any confusion or query; we’ll be sure to help you out!

Shujaa Imran

Shujaa Imran is MakeTechEasier’s resident Mac tutorial writer. He’s currently training to follow his other passion become a commercial pilot. You can check his content out on Youtube

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How To Place Multiple Images In Text With Photoshop

How to Place Multiple Images in Text with Photoshop

Learn how to place multiple images in text with Photoshop by splitting a word into its individual letters and filling each letter with a different image! A step-by-step tutorial.

Download the PDF: How to Place Multiple Images In Text

Written by Steve Patterson.

In a previous tutorial, I showed you the basics of how to place an image in text with Photoshop. And in that lesson, we placed a single image into an entire word. But what if you want to place a different image in each letter? That’s exactly what we’ll learn how to do here.

We’ll start by creating a document and adding some text. Then I’ll show you how to divide the text into separate letters and place a different image in each letter. Once the main effect is done, we’ll learn how to change the background color behind the text, or make the background transparent, and how to quickly add layer effects, like a stroke or a drop shadow, to every letter at once! And at the end, I’ll show you how to make sure that your text is perfectly centered in the document.

Here’s an example of what the final images in text effect will look like when we’re done:

The final result.

Let’s get started!

Download this tutorial as a print-ready PDF!

Which version of Photoshop do I need?

To follow along, you’ll want to be using Photoshop 2023 or later. You can get the latest Photoshop version here.

How to place images in text with Photoshop

In this first part of the tutorial, we’ll create the main effect by filling each letter in the word with a different image. Then once the main effect is done, we’ll look at a few ways to enhance it.

Step 1: Create a new Photoshop document

I’ll start from the beginning by creating a new document and adding the text. But if you’ve already done that, you can skip ahead to Step 5.

Or if you’re in Photoshop’s main interface, create a new document by going up to the File menu and choosing New:

Then in the New Document dialog box, enter your settings. I’ll set the Width to 3000 pixels and the Height to 1800. The Resolution is 300 pixels per inch. The Color Mode is RGB. Background Contents is set to White. And the Color Profile is sRGB:

The new document settings.

Step 2: Add your text

To add the text, select the Type Tool from Photoshop’s toolbar:

Selecting the Type Tool.

And then in the Options Bar, choose your font. Since we’ll be placing images into the text, larger fonts will work best. I’m using HWT Artz which I installed from Adobe Fonts:

Choosing a font in the Options Bar.

Set the type Size to 72 points so we’re starting with the largest preset size:

The type size option.

And to make it easier to center the text in the document, set the Justification to Center:

The type justification option.

Choosing black in the Color Picker.

Adding the text to the document.

Step 3: Resize and move the text with Free Transform

To resize the text, go up to the Edit menu in the Menu Bar and choose Free Transform:

And then resize the text by dragging the handles. If you press and hold the Alt key on a Windows PC or the Option key on a Mac while dragging a handle, you’ll resize the text from its center:

Dragging the transform handles to resize the text.

Centering the text in the document.

Step 4: Adjust the letter spacing (optional)

In my case, the letters are a bit too close together:

The letters are spaced too close together.

To fix that, I’ll go to the Properties panel:

Going to the Properties panel.

Then down to the Character options:

Going to the Character options.

On my keyboard, I’ll press the Up Arrow key once to increase the tracking value from 0 to 20. Then I’ll press Enter (Win) / Return (Mac) on my keyboard to accept it:

Increasing the Tracking value to 20.

And that spaces the letters a bit farther apart:

The letter spacing has been increased.

Step 5: Convert the type into a shape

At this point, we’re ready to place our images into the text. And in the Layers panel, we see the text on a type layer:

The type layer above the Background layer.

If we were placing a single image into the entire word, we could leave the text as standard type. But we want to place a different image in each letter. So we need a way to split the word into its individual letters. To do that, we’ll convert the type into a shape.

With the type layer selected, go up to the Type menu in the Menu Bar:

Opening the Type menu.

And choose Convert to Shape:

Choosing the Convert to Shape command.

You’ll know that the letters are now shapes by the path outlines around them:

A path outline appears around each letter.

And in the Layers panel, the shape icon in the preview thumbnail tells us that the type layer is now a shape layer:

Shape layers have their own icons in the preview thumbnail.

Step 6: Make a copy of the shape layer for each letter

We need to place each letter on its own separate layer. And to do that, we need to make a copy of the shape layer for each letter in the word. In my case, I have three letters. So since I already have the first shape layer, I need to make two more copies.

Selecting the shape layer.

And drag it down onto the New Layer icon:

Making a copy of the shape layer.

Release your mouse button, and the first copy appears above the original:

The first copy of the shape layer.

Making a copy of the copy.

Release your mouse button, and the second copy appears. I now have three shape layers, one for each letter. If you have more than three letters, make as many copies as you need:

The second copy of the shape layer.

Step 7: Delete the unwanted letters on each shape layer

Next, delete the letters you don’t need on each layer, starting with the original shape layer.

Deleting all but the first letter on the first shape layer

Turning off the shape layers above the original.

Selecting the original shape layer.

In the toolbar, select the Path Selection Tool:

Selecting the Path Selection Tool.

Then to delete the letter, press the Backspace key on a Windows PC or the Delete key on a Mac:

The second letter has been deleted.

And press Backspace (Win) / Delete (Mac) to delete it. If you have more than three letters, continue deleting the others until only the first letter remains:

The third letter has been deleted.

Deleting all but the second letter on the second shape layer

Turning off the original shape layer.

Then turn on the shape layer above it:

Turning on the second shape layer.

Selecting the second shape layer.

Selecting the first letter.

And press Backspace (Win) / Delete (Mac) to delete it:

The first letter has been deleted.

Selecting the third letter.

And press Backspace (Win) / Delete (Mac). Only the second letter should remain on the second shape layer:

The third letter has been deleted.

Deleting all but the third letter on the third shape layer

Turn the second shape layer off:

Turning off the second shape layer.

Then turn on the third shape layer:

Turning on the third shape layer.

Selecting the third shape layer.

Dragging over part of the first two letters to select them.

Then with both letters selected, press Backspace (Win) / Delete (Mac). And now we have just the third letter on the third shape layer:

The first two letters have been deleted.

If you have more than three letters, you’ll need to continue with these steps for each additional shape layer. But in my case, I have all the layers I need, and if I turn all three shape layers back on:

Turning all the shape layers back on.

The entire word reappears:

All three letters are again visible.

Download this tutorial as a print-ready PDF!

Step 8: Place the first image into the document

So with each letter on its own layer, we’re ready to add our images. We’ll start by placing an image into the first letter.

Reselecting the first shape layer.

Turning off the shape layers above it.

We want the image to appear on a layer directly above the letter it’s being placed into. So make sure you have the first shape layer selected. Then to add an image, go up to the File menu:

Opening the File menu.

And choose Place Embedded:

Choosing the Place Embedded command.

Selecting the image to place into the first letter.

The image opens in the document (woman with tulips from Adobe Stock). And if the image is larger than your document size, it’s automatically resized to fit:

The first image opens.

Step 9: Create a clipping mask

Also notice in the Layers panel that Photoshop added the image on its own layer directly above the first letter, which is exactly where we want it:

The image was added above the first letter.

Learn how to open multiple images as layers into Photoshop!

And choose Create Clipping Mask:

Choosing the Create Clipping Mask command.

The clipping mask hides any part of the image that’s not sitting directly above the letter, which creates the illusion that the image is actually inside it:

The image appears inside the letter after creating the clipping mask.

Step 10: Resize and move the image inside the first letter

Then to move and resize the image within the letter, go up to the Edit menu and choose Free Transform:

Drag your subject into view inside the letter:

Moving the image into position.

And drag the handles to resize the image within the letter. You’ll probably need to go back and forth between moving and resizing until it looks right:

Resizing the image.

Step 11: Place the second image into the document

Then just repeat the same steps to place your images into the other letters.

In the Layers panel, turn on the second letter:

Turning on the second shape layer.

Selecting the second shape layer.

Go up to the File menu and choose Place Embedded:

Selecting the image to place into the second letter.

The image opens in the document (beared man from Adobe Stock). And again Photoshop opens the Free Transform command which we don’t need just yet:

The second image opens, and so does Free Transform.

Step 12: Create a clipping mask

In the Layers panel, we see that the image was added above the second letter, right where we need it:

The image was added above the second letter.

And choose Create Clipping Mask:

Choosing the Create Clipping Mask command.

The clipping mask places the image inside the letter:

The second image is now inside the second letter.

Step 13: Resize and move the image inside the second letter

Go up to the Edit menu and choose Free Transform:

And then drag your subject into view inside the second letter:

Moving the second image into position.

And drag the handles to resize the image as needed:

Resizing the second image.

Step 14: Place the third image into the document

Turning on the third shape layer.

Selecting the third shape layer.

Then I’ll go up to the File menu and choose Place Embedded:

Selecting the image to place into the third letter.

When the image opens (smiling woman from Adobe Stock):

The third image opens in the document.

And again in the Layers panel, we see the image on its own layer above the letter:

The image was added above the third letter.

Step 15: Create a clipping mask

And I’ll choose Create Clipping Mask:

Choosing the Create Clipping Mask command.

This places the image inside the letter:

The third image is now inside the third letter.

Step 16: Resize and move the image inside the third letter

Then I’ll go back to the Edit menu and back to Free Transform:

I’ll drag the woman into view:

Moving the third image into position.

And I’ll drag the handles to resize the image:

Resizing the third image.

And now every letter in the word has a different image placed inside it:

All three images have been placed into the text.

Placing the letters and images into a group

At this point, the main effect is done. We’ve placed all of our images into the text. But there’s a few more things we can do. We can change the background color, or remove the background completely and make it transparent. And we can add layer effects like a stroke or a drop shadow. I’ll show you how to do each of these things in a moment.

But first, let’s take all of the image layers and shape layers that make up the effect and place them into a group. This will make everything else we’re about to do easier.

Step 1: Select all shape and image layers

Selecting the top image layer.

Step 2: Select New Group from Layers

And choose New Group from Layers:

Choosing the New Group from Layers command.

Step 3: Name the new group

Naming the group.

The new layer group.

How to remove the background behind the letters

So what if you want to remove the background behind the letters and make it transparent?

Turning off the background.

And now we have a checkerboard pattern for a background which is how Photoshop represents transparency:

The background behind the letters is now transparent.

That’s not what I want though, so I’ll turn the Background layer back on:

Turning the Background layer on.

How to change the background color

Selecting the Background layer.

And choose a Solid Color fill layer:

Choosing Solid Color from the list.

Option 1: Choosing a color from the Color Picker

To choose a new background color, you could select one from the Color Picker. The default color is black which often works well, but you can choose any color you like:

Choosing a new background color from the Color Picker.

Option 2: Sampling a color from an image

Sampling a new background color from one of the images.

Choosing a light gray.

And here’s my result with the light gray background:

The new background color.

The Solid Color fill layer.

Adding a stroke around the letters

Let’s finish things off by adding a stroke and a drop shadow to the letters. We’ll start with a stroke. But rather than adding the effects to each letter one at a time, we can add them to every letter at once by applying them to the group.

Step 1: Select the layer group

Selecting the layer group.

Step 2: Add a stroke

And choose Stroke from the list:

Adding a Stroke effect.

Step 3: Choose the stroke color

Choosing white from the Color Picker.

Step 4: Change the position to Outside

Change the Position of the Stroke to Outside so it appears around the outside of the letters:

Changing the Position to Outside.

Step 5: Adjust the stroke size

And then drag the Size slider to set the stroke width. I’ll set mine to 16 pixels:

Adjusting the stroke size with the slider.

Since we applied the stroke to the group, it appears around every letter at once:

The white stroke appears around the letters.

Adding a drop shadow behind the letters

Finally, let’s add a drop shadow. And then I’ll show you a quick tip for centering your text in the document.

Step 1: Select Drop Shadow from the Layer Style dialog box

Adding a drop shadow.

Step 2: Adjust the shadow’s angle, distance and size

Related: Add a long shadow effect to your text!

Or you can enter specific values in the Layer Style dialog box. I’ll set the Angle to 120 degrees and the Distance to 50 pixels. Then to soften the shadow edges, I’ll increase the Size to 25 pixels:

Setting the Angle, Distance and Size of the drop shadow.

Step 3: Close the Layer Style dialog box

And here’s the result with the stroke and the drop shadow added. Again, since we applied the drop shadow to the group, it was added to every letter inside the group at once:

The result after adding the layer effects.

Back in the Layers panel, we see our Stroke and Drop Shadow listed below the group:

The layer effects are listed below the group.

Tip! How to center the text in the document

Here’s one final tip if you want to make sure that your text is centered in the document.

Step 1: Select the group

First make sure the group is selected:

Selecting the layer group.

Step 2: Select the Move Tool

Then select the Move Tool from the toolbar:

Selecting the Move Tool.

Step 3: Open the Align and Distribute options Step 4: Set the Align To option to Canvas

Set the Align To option to Canvas:

Setting Align To to Canvas.

And here’s the final result with the text perfectly centered:

The final, centered result.

And there we have it! For a similar effect, learn how to place an image in a shape with Photoshop, or how to add transparent text to an image. And don’t forget, all of our Photoshop tutorials are available to download as PDFs!

How To Stylize Images Using Stable Diffusion Ai

Image stylization is a process of transforming the style of an image to a new one. For example, you may want to create a pencil drawing from a photo you have taken.

There has been a long line of research in style transfer, starting with hand-crafted algorithms to the state-of-the-art neural-network based methods.

In this article, I will explore image stylization using Stable Diffusion, a text-to-image model trained with millions of image-text pairs.

While existing methods have already created impressive results, the benefit of using text-to-image model is that all styles are already embedded in the model. No training is required. You will only need to specify the style you want with the text prompt. Lastly, if you are not happy with the result of the embedded model, you can further fine-tune and create your own model.

GUI

I will show you how to do it with AUTOMATIC1111 GUI. See my quick start guide for setting up in Google’s cloud server.

Workflow for stylizing images

Basic idea

The basic idea is to use img2img to modify an image with the new style specified in the text prompt.

Instead of using a random latent state, the original image was used to encode the initial latent state. With a small amount of randomness added, which is controlled by the denoising strength, the model constructs a new image according to the text prompt.

So if you include pencil drawing in your text prompt, the synthesized image will include visual elements of pencil drawing but the content of the image still follows the original one.

Step-by-step workflow

OK, enough of these theoretical stuffs! Here’s how you would actually do it.

I will use the following starting image generated using the Victorian girl prompt:

The original image to be stylized.

In AUTOMATIC1111 GUI, go to img2img tab and select the img2img sub tab. Upload the image to the img2img canvas.

Next you will need to give a prompt. The prompt should describes both the new style and the content of the original image. It does not need to be super detailed. Below is what I will use.

Insert the art style to the blank. (E.g. a charcoal sketch of a beautiful woman)

For stylizing images, you will be most tweaking two parameters: CFG scale and denoising strength.

If you want to be systematic, you can use the X/Y plot script to explore the interplay between CFG scale and Denoising strength. The image is specified by the seed value.

X/Y plot script settings.

Using the prompt:

A pencil sketch of a beautiful woman

Below is what you will get.

X/Y Plot of CFG scale vs denoising strength

When denoising strength is high, the image changes too much and loses it original content. When it is low, not much is changed.

The higher the CFG scale, the stronger the style is.

Euler sampling method with 50 steps works for most situations.

As a rule of thumb, set CFG scale to a high value between 20-30, and change denoising strength between 0.2 and 0.6 to achieve a good stylization while preserving the content.

Examples of stylized images

All stylized images in this section is generated from the original image below with zero examples. Only text prompts are provided.

Original

Here are some stylized images. The prompt is

The blank is filled in with the caption.

Charcoal

Impressionist

Pop art

Art Deco

Photograph

Art Nouveau

Cubism

John Sargent

Greg Rutkowski

3D character

Stone Sculpture

Van Gogh

Comic Strip

Modern fashion

It is also possible to switch the model to a different ethnicity.

Japanese

African

Hispanic

Alternative method

Adventurous readers can experiment with the so-called alternative img2img test which can preserve the content of original image far better than the method above.

The idea is to use the original image to create the latent noise pattern so that that it contains information of the original content.

To use the alternative noise, select img2img alternative test in the script dropdown menu.

New users should go through the example in the feature demo. Contrary to the demo, I found it useful to increase CFG scale so that the prompt is followed. Sometimes the weight of the style keyword needs to be increased.

Below is an example of pop art style generated with alternative img2img.

Pop art style using alternative img2img.

Whether it is better would be a matter of taste but it definitely follows the original content closely.

Treat it as an tool in your toolbox.

Summary

I have showed you how easy it is to use Stable Diffusion to stylize images. All you need to do is to use img2img method, supply a prompt, dial up the CFG scale, and tweak the denoising strength.

I hope this will inspire you to create some new artworks!

Create Color Swatches From Images In Photoshop 2023

Create Color Swatches from Images in Photoshop 2023

Learn how to turn photos into color swatches by sampling colors directly from images, and how to save your colors as custom swatch sets, in the latest version of Photoshop CC!

Written by Steve Patterson.

In the previous tutorial, we learned all about the improved Swatches panel in Photoshop CC 2023. We looked at Photoshop’s new default color swatches, and the new ways to drag and drop colors from the Swatches panel directly into the document.

This time, I show you how easy it is to create your own color swatches in Photoshop. Specifically, you’ll learn how to create swatches by sampling colors from an image. You’ll also learn how to organize your swatches into custom sets. And along the way, I’ll show you a simple trick you can use to reduce the number of colors in your image so that choosing colors becomes a whole lot easier.

For best results with this tutorial, you’ll need Photoshop 2023 or newer. If you’re already using Photoshop CC, make sure that your copy is up to date.

The document setup

To follow along with me, go ahead and open any image. I’ll use this image that I downloaded from Adobe Stock:

The original image. Photo credit: Adobe Stock.

Let’s get started!

How to reduce the number of colors in the image

Before we start sampling colors from the image, let’s look at how to make the process of selecting colors easier by reducing the number of colors we can choose from. To do that, we’ll pixelate the image. This step is not absolutely necessary, but you may find it helpful.

Step 1: Duplicate the image layer

In the Layers panel, we see my image on the Background layer:

The Layers panel showing the original image.

Dragging the image onto the Add New Layer icon.

Release your mouse button, and a copy of the layer appears above the original:

A copy of the image appears.

Learn all about layers in Photoshop with our Complete Guide!

Step 2: Select the Mosaic filter

To pixelate the image, go up to the Filter menu in the Menu Bar, choose Pixelate, and then choose Mosaic:

Step 3: Adjust the Cell Size value

In the Mosaic filter’s dialog box, the Cell Size option at the bottom determines the number of squares, or “pixels”, that the image will be divided into. Photoshop averages the colors in the image and fills each square with a single color.

Adjusting the Cell Size value.

Here’s my result after applying the Mosaic filter. With the image now pixelated, we have a clearer view of the photo’s overall color palette, and we’ll have an easier time choosing the colors we need:

The result after pixelating the image with the Mosaic filter.

Keep filter effects editable with Smart Filters in Photoshop!

Creating a new swatch set in Photoshop CC 2023

So now that we’ve pixelated the image, we’re ready to start sampling some colors to create swatches. And to keep the Swatches panel organized, we’ll first create a new swatch set that we can place our swatches into.

Step 1: Open the Swatches panel

Start by opening the Swatches panel. In Photoshop CC 2023, the Swatches panel is grouped in with the Color, Gradients and Patterns panels.

The default color swatch sets in Photoshop CC 2023.

Step 2: Create a new swatch set

Naming the new swatch set.

Your new set appears below the other sets in the list:

The new “My Swatches” set appears.

Tip! Create swatch sets within the main set

But rather than placing all of your custom swatches into the same set, it’s usually better to divide them into smaller sets within the main one. In other words, if you’ll be creating swatches from different images, you may want the swatches from each image to be saved in their own set.

Step 1: Create another new swatch set

Naming the new set.

Back in the Swatches panel, the new “Portrait” set appears below the “My Swatches” set:

The second set appears.

Step 2: Drag the new set onto the main set

To move the “Portrait” set into the “My Swatches” set, all I need to do is drag the “Portrait” set up and onto it. When a blue highlight box appears around the “My Swatches” set, I’ll release my mouse button:

Dragging one set onto another set.

And now, the new set is nested inside the main one:

The Swatches panel showing the nested swatch set.

How to create color swatches in Photoshop

Now that we’ve created a new set to hold our swatches, let’s learn how to create swatches by sampling different colors from the image.

Step 1: Select a swatch set in the Swatches panel

First, in the Swatches panel, make sure the set you want to save the swatches into is selected. I’ll choose my “Portrait” set:

Choosing the correct swatch set.

Step 2: Select the Eyedropper Tool

Next, in the toolbar, select the Eyedropper Tool. You can also select the Eyedropper Tool from your keyboard by pressing the letter I:

Selecting the Eyedropper Tool.

Selecting the Eyedropper Tool.

Back in the toolbar, the color you sampled appears as your new Foreground color:

The Foreground Color swatch shows the sampled color.

You can name the new swatch in the Color Swatch Name dialog box, or just accept the default name. And you can add the new swatch to your Creative Cloud library by selecting the Add to my current library option. I don’t need to do that so I’ll uncheck it.

The Color Swatch Name dialog box.

Tip! How to skip the Color Swatch Name dialog box

The new swatch appears as a thumbnail in the active swatch set:

The sampled color is saved as a new swatch.

See also: How to choose text colors from images!

How to delete a color swatch

Deleting the selected color swatch.

The Delete Swatch dialog box.

And then choose Delete Swatch from the menu:

Choosing the Delete Swatch command.

Creating more color swatches

All of your new swatches will appear in the set, ready to be used in your layout or in future designs:

The new swatches.

Deleting the pixelated version of the image

Finally, to delete the pixelated version of the image when you’re done, select its layer in the Layers panel and simply drag it down onto the Delete Layer icon (the trash bin):

Dragging the pixelated version onto the trash bin.

And there we have it! That’s how easy it is to create your own color swatches, and how to save them in custom sets, in Photoshop CC 2023! In the next tutorial, I’ll show you how to import and export your color swatches so you’ll always have them when you need them!

Check out our Photoshop Basics section for more tutorials. And don’t forget, all of our Photoshop tutorials are available to download as PDFs!

How To Add A Drop Shadow To Text And Images In Photoshop

When you want to add a drop shadow to text or images in Photoshop, it’s not immediately obvious how to do it. That’s because drop shadow effects are hidden within the layer styles settings.

Now there are a variety of effects that you can use to improve the look of your drop shadows in Photoshop. Whether you want a simple black shadow or want to spice it up with color, it’s all done easily in the layer styles dialogue box. In this tutorial, you’ll gain an in-depth look at the step-by-step process of creating drop shadows, along with some helpful tips to make your shadows look exactly as you envision!

How To Add A Drop Shadow In Photoshop

Step 1: Highlight The Text Or Image Layer

In this example, I’ll be adding a drop shadow to text, but the same steps apply with an image layer.

The easiest way to add a layer effect in Photoshop is via the FX icon found at the bottom of your layers panel.

The drop shadow will be applied to your selected text or image layer, but there are still some additional settings left to adjust!

Step 3: Adjust The Drop Shadow Position

After selecting the drop shadow option, the layer styles dialogue box will open to reveal your shadow settings. The first order of business is to adjust the position of the drop shadow. This is easily done using the angle adjustment.

For example, the white line is pointed downwards, indicating which side the light is shining from, creating a shadow on the text’s upper side. This works the same for anywhere you position the light angle.

Your second option is to simply type in the exact angle you want the shadow to be at. By typing in 45°, for example, it will adjust the light angle accordingly.

Both options work equally well to change your drop shadow’s position, but the light source adjustment makes it easier since you can experiment more.

Step 4: Refine The Look Of The Shadow

Now that the drop shadow is at the angle you’re looking for; it’s time to adjust the look of your drop shadow. Below the angle adjustment are three sliders called Distance, Spread, and Size; let’s break down what each of them does.

Distance: This adjustment controls how far your shadow is from your text or image. The greater your distance, the more disconnected the drop shadow and layer will become.

Spread: This controls how broad your drop shadow is in relation to your layer. With a text layer drop shadow, for example, a larger spread will thicken each letter’s shadow’s look.

Size: The size setting operates a lot like the feather adjustment of the Brush Tool. With a larger size, the edges of your drop shadow will become increasingly soft.

There is no right or wrong way of adjusting these sliders, so just experiment with each one until you’re happy with the look of the drop shadow.

How To Change The Color Of A Drop Shadow In Photoshop

There are additional ways to adjust the look of the color with the blending mode or opacity. In most cases, it’s best to leave the blending mode set to “Normal.”

As for opacity, you can change the drop shadow’s transparency by bringing this up or down. With a 0% opacity, the drop shadow will be completely invisible, while at 100% opacity, it will be fully visible. If you are going for a subtle drop shadow, try lowering the opacity to quickly soften the intensity of the drop shadow.

How To Create Long Drop Shadows In Photoshop

Now unlike a regular drop shadow, long drop shadows stretch out from your image or text much further while still remaining connected. Unfortunately, there isn’t a way to create long drop shadows using the techniques you’ve learned so far. Luckily, they’re still easy to create using the steps outlined below.

To make long shadows in Photoshop, first, duplicate your text. Select the bottom layer and press Command/Control + T to angle the text to match the desired shadow. Commit to your changes, then hold Alt/Option + upward arrow key to duplicate the angled text 100 times. Once complete, merge the duplicate layers and move them behind your original text.

Step 1: Duplicate Your Text Or Image Layer

Depending on whether you want to create a long shadow on text or an image, the steps will vary slightly at the beginning. With that said, this step remains the same for both situations. With your text or image layer highlighted, press Command/Control + J (Mac/PC) to duplicate the layer.

Step 2: Change The Color Of The Bottom Layer

Before you create the long drop shadow, let’s pick a color. In the case of text, select the text layer, open the character panel, and pick a new text color.

With the selection still active, press Alt/Option + Delete (PC/Mac) to fill the selection with the foreground color. Then press Command/Control + D (Mac/PC) to deselect the image layer.

Step 3: Adjust The Angle Of Your Text Or Image

Since you are working with the underlying layer, you should see the angled layer beneath your duplicated layer.

Step 4: Duplicate The Angled Layer 100 Times

100 times?! Are you crazy?!

This might seem like a lot, but there is an easy keyboard shortcut you can use to do this in seconds. With the underlying angled layer selected, make sure to activate the Move Tool by pressing V. Now, press and hold Alt/Option + Up Arrow Key to duplicate and move your layer continuously.

By holding this shortcut, Photoshop will continue to duplicate and move your layer to eventually create a long shadow. After about 100 copies, you’re left with enough to work with for this effect.

Step 5: Merge The Duplicated Layers

Ah, peace and order have been restored to the layers panel.

Step 6: Correct The Angle Of The Long Shadow

Now you have a long shadow, but it doesn’t match up with your text or image. By pressing Command/Control + T (Mac/PC), go back to the rotate setting and enter your original input’s negative value. Since I set the rotation angle to 45° previously, I’ll now set it to -45° to correct it.

Step 7: Reposition The Long Shadow

Your long drop shadow may be a bit off from your text or image, so reposition is by selecting the Move Tool (V) and dragging it into place.

Step 8: Duplicate & Extend The Long Shadow

If you are happy with the size of your long shadow, then your work is done. However, you can further extend the shadow by duplicating and moving the layer. With the long shadow layer selected, press Command/Control + J (Mac/PC) to duplicate it. Using the Move Tool (V), reposition the duplicated long shadow to extend off the previous one.

Rinse and repeat these steps, duplicating and repositioning, until the long shadow is extended as much as you want.

Now you’ve successfully created a long drop shadow in Photoshop on a text or image layer! From here, you can further stylize your graphic by changing the background color or even adding a gradient!

With the tips outlined here, you’re equipped to take on any drop shadow effect with ease. Whether you want standard drop shadows added to your text or take things further with a long drop shadow on your images, it’s all done in a few easy steps. Drop shadows are a great way to stylize your graphics but also make them pop from the background. Another worthy option for making things stand out from the background is by outlining your text, images, or cutouts. You can learn exactly how to outline your images in this next tutorial!

Happy Editing,

Brendan 🙂

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