Trending November 2023 # File Format Module Cannot Parse The File In Adobe Photoshop # Suggested December 2023 # Top 11 Popular

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When users try to open a file in PhotoShop, they encounter an error that stops them from accessing or editing the file. This error message often comes when the file is corrupted or incompatible. Following is the exact error message that the user sees.

Could not complete your request because the file-format module cannot parse the file

Fix File Format Module Cannot Parse the File in Adobe Photoshop

In case, Adobe is unable to parse the file, first of all, check the format of the file. If the file format is not supported, we can change the extension of the same. You may also encounter this issue due to misconfigured registry, some bug, or corrupted Photoshop preferences. Hereinafter, we will see what you can do to remedy the situation.

If File Format Module cannot parse the file in Adobe Photoshop, you can use some methods to fix this problem.

Change the Image extension

Edit Adobe Photoshop DWORD Value in Registry

Update Photoshop

Reset Photoshop Preferences

Let’s discuss these methods one by one

1] Change the Image extension

You may face this error if the image file format is not compatible. So, you should open this image file in MS Paint to change the image format. To know the supported file format, visit chúng tôi If your file is compatible with the app, you can skip this method.

Use the following steps to change the file format of the image.

Select the required file format like png, jpg/jpeg, etc, and save in a compatible format.

After using this method, try parsing the file in Adobe Photoshop, your issue should be resolved.

2] Edit Adobe Photoshop DWORD Value in Registry

If the problem is still unsolved, you may fix this error by changing the integer value of the Adobe photoshop DWORD value in Registry. Many users have experienced, changing the Photoshop DWORD value in Windows Registry has resolved this error.

Before modifying the registry, you need to take a backup of the registry because if any problem comes up in the future, we can revert the registry.

Follow the prescribed steps to change the registry’s DWORD value.

Open the Run dialog box, and press the Windows + R key simultaneously.

Write regedit in the Run dialog box and press the OK button.

Go to the following directory.

Check the Hexadecimal in the Base option and type the value “4000”(1000=1GB).

Save all changes and close the Window dialog box and reboot the system.

Open your photo in Adobe Photoshop and confirm whether the error is resolved or not.

3] Update Photoshop

Updating your Photoshop application will remove the bug that was causing this issue. In that case, if you want to resolve the error then you need to update your Photoshop. You have to use the following steps to update photoshop.

Launch the Creative Cloud Desktop app on your PC.

Log in to your account.

After finishing the update, your issue will be fixed.

4] Reset Photoshop Preferences

You can encounter the issue in question due to a corrupted preference file. In order to resolve the issue, in that case, we will reset the preference file of Adobe Photoshop from its setting. Follow the prescribed steps to do the same.

Close and relaunch Photoshop. Hopefully, this will resolve the issue for you.

You may see Photoshop could not complete your request because of a program error due to bad image or corruption in the app. This is very common and if a user is even slightly reckless with their computer, there is a high chance that this error will appear. We recommend you check our guide on what to do if Photoshop could not complete your request because of a program.

Read: Adobe Photoshop Graphics Processor not detected.

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Reducing Photoshop File Sizes With Adjustment Layers

Reducing Photoshop File Sizes with Adjustment Layers

Written by Steve Patterson.

In this Photoshop tutorial, we’re going to look at a great way to help keep things running smoothly as we edit our images by keeping our Photoshop file sizes as small as possible using adjustment layers!

In a previous tutorial, we looked at one of the major benefits of adding Photoshop’s adjustment layers to our photo editing workflow, which is that they allow us to work flexibly and non-destructively on our images. We can make as many edits and re-edits as we want to a photo and never have to worry about making a single permanent change to the original image. Be sure to check out our Non-Destructive Photo Editing with Adjustment Layers tutorial for more information.

Being able to work non-destructively on our images is certainly a great reason to stop using Photoshop’s standard image adjustments and start using adjustment layers, but there’s other equally good reasons to make the switch. One of the biggest complaints with Photoshop is that no matter how much memory (RAM) you have in your computer, it never seems to be enough. And with the number of megapixels in the latest digital cameras always increasing, the problem just keeps getting worse.

Larger photos mean larger file sizes, and the larger the file size, the more of your computer’s memory Photoshop needs to work with it. And that’s just to get the original photo open your screen. Typically, as you edit the photo, you add more and more layers, and each one of those layers takes up more and more of your computer’s memory. On top of that, Photoshop needs even more memory to complete all of the fancy, complex math that goes on behind the scenes as you’re working on the image.

If your computer runs out of memory as you’re working, Photoshop has to use the scratch disk, which is simply an area of your computer’s hard drive that Photoshop uses as memory. The problem is, your hard drive is much, much slower than actual system memory, which means that any time Photoshop is forced to use the scratch disk, it will run that much slower.

Is there any way that we can reduce the amount of memory that Photoshop needs? There sure is, and that’s by keeping our file sizes as small as possible. One way to do that would be to throw out our expensive digital cameras and start taking all of our photos with the little 2 or 3 MP camera inside our cell phones, although the bride and groom may not be too impressed when you show up to take their wedding photos with your iPhone. A better solution would be to come up with a more efficient way of working on our images, one that keeps our file sizes in Photoshop as small as possible without sacrificing any of our editing capabilities. A great way to do that is by using adjustment layers. Let’s look at an example.

Here we have a photo I snapped one Spring evening while walking through a park:

An underexposed photo.

The image is underexposed and needs to be brightened. Back in our Screen Your Way To Better Exposure tutorial, we looked at a quick and easy way to fix underexposed images using Photoshop’s Screen blend mode. I’m going to quickly run through the same steps here. Before I do anything though, let’s find out how large my Photoshop document currently is. We can do that by looking along the bottom of the document window:

The current size of the Photoshop file is displayed along the bottom of the document window.

You’ll see two file sizes listed beside each other. The one on the left tells us how large the Photoshop file would be if we were to flatten the document down to a single layer, while the one on the right tells us how large our file actually is (the unflattened version) with all of its separate layers still intact. My document window is currently showing the exact same file size (22.8 MB) for both the flattened and unflattened version, and that’s because I just opened the image and haven’t done anything to it yet. If we look in the Layers palette, we can see that the photo is sitting all by itself on the Background layer, and since there’s only one layer in the document, both the flattened and unflattened version are exactly the same size:

The flattened and unflattened version of the document are the same size with only one layer in the Layers palette.

Let’s see what happens when I start brightening the image using what we might call the “traditional” way of working in Photoshop. First, I’ll duplicate the Background layer using the keyboard shortcut Ctrl+J (Win) / Command+J (Mac). Photoshop adds a copy of the Background layer directly above the original and names the copy “Layer 1”. Then, to brighten my image, I’m going to go up to the Blend Mode option at the top of the Layers palette and change the blend mode from “Normal” to Screen:

The Layers palette showing the copy of the Background layer above the original, with its blend mode changed to Screen.

Simply by changing the blend mode of the duplicate layer to Screen, the photo now appears brighter:

The photo now appears brighter after changing the blend mode to Screen.

That was certainly easy enough, but let’s see what’s happened to the size of our Photoshop file. Again, we can see the current file size by looking along the bottom of the document window. In my case, if we look at the size of the unflattened version (the number on the right), we can see that just by duplicating my Background layer, I’ve managed to double the size of the file. Instead of needing 22.8 MB of memory to display my image, Photoshop now needs 45.6 MB of memory:

Duplicating the Background layer has caused the Photoshop document to double in file size.

I think my photo could still use a little more brightening, so I’m going to duplicate “Layer 1” by again pressing the keyboard shortcut Ctrl+J (Win) / Command+J (Mac). This adds a second copy of my image directly above “Layer 1”. I’m going to leave the blend mode of this new layer set to Screen since I’m using it to brighten my image even more, but I actually find that the image is now a little too bright, so I’m going to fine-tune the brightness by lowering the Opacity of the new layer down to 50%:

Adding a second copy of the image, then lowering the opacity of the new layer to 50%.

I’ve now successfully brightened the photo using nothing more than a couple of copies of the image, the Screen blend mode and the Opacity setting:

The photo now appears even brighter after adding a second copy of the image.

Let’s check on our file size at the bottom of the document window, where we can see that our original 22.8 MB file has now tripled in size to 68.3 MB, all because we duplicated the original image twice:

Duplicating the image twice has tripled the file size of the Photoshop document.

Brightening the image with the Screen blend mode has resulted in the colors looking a little dull, so I’m going to finish things off by boosting the color saturation. This time, rather than simply duplicating the top layer, I’m going to merge all three existing layers onto a new layer above them using the keyboard shortcut Shift+Ctrl+Alt+E (Win) / Shift+Command+Option+E (Mac). We can see in the Layers palette that all three layers have now been merged onto a fourth layer at the top:

The three layers have been merged onto a separate layer above them.

Increasing color saturation with the Hue/Saturation command.

The color saturation in the photo has been increased.

With about two minutes worth of work, I’ve managed to turn a dark, underexposed image into a bright and colorful one. Unfortunately, I’ve also managed to increase the file size of my Photoshop document from the 22.8 MB it was originally all the way up to 91.1 MB, which mean Photoshop now needs four times the amount of memory to display my image on the screen, not to mention all the additional memory it now needs to perform all the math behind the scenes:

The Photoshop document is now four times its original size.

Keep in mind that this was just a simple example of how quickly the file size of our Photoshop documents can increase as we edit our images. Your computer may not have a problem working with a document that’s only 91.1 MB in size, but with serious photo editing work, or if you’re creating complex photo effects, you could easily find yourself working with hundreds of layers, each one taking up more and more of your computer’s memory. And as I mentioned earlier, the problem only gets worse as the number of megapixels in today’s digital cameras continually increases.

How can we keep the file size of our Photoshop documents from getting out of control? One simple and effective way is by using adjustment layers whenever possible. Let’s go through the exact same steps that we just looked at, but this time, rather than creating copy after copy of our image, we’ll use adjustment layers!

First, before we begin editing the photo with adjustment layers, I’ll revert my image back to its original unedited state by going up to the File menu at the top of the screen and choosing Revert. My photo is now back to looking dark and underexposed, and I’m back to having just one layer – the Background layer – in the Layers palette:

The photo has been reverted back to its original state.

Selecting a Levels adjustment layer from the bottom of the Layers palette.

The Layers palette showing the newly added Levels adjustment layer above the Background layer, with its blend mode set to Screen.

The photo now appears much brighter. In fact, it appears just as bright as when we duplicated the Background layer and changed its blend mode to Screen. The results are exactly the same:

The photo is now brighter after changing the blend mode of the adjustment layer to Screen.

If the results are the same, what’s so great about using the adjustment layer instead of a copy of the Background layer? What’s great about it becomes clear when we check out the new file size of our document. If you recall, when we duplicated the Background layer, it doubled the size of our Photoshop document from 22.8 MB up to 45.6 MB. This time, by using a Levels adjustment layer instead of duplicating the Background layer, our file size remains unchanged:

The file size remains the same after adding the Levels adjustment layer.

We just saved ourselves 22.8 MB of additional file size simply by using an adjustment layer in place of a normal pixel-based layer! Whenever we add an adjustment layer to our document, Photoshop stores all the information about the image within the adjustment layer itself, but it does it without the large file size increases that we get from adding pixel-based layers. In fact, in my case here, the file size increase was so small that it didn’t even register. That won’t always be the case, but the increase will always be much less than if you had used a pixel-based layer.

Why did I choose a Levels adjustment layer as opposed to a Curves or Hue/Saturation adjustment layer? I chose Levels only because it’s one of the most commonly used adjustment layers, but since I wasn’t planning on doing anything with the adjustment layer (other than changing its blend mode) and only added it in place of a pixel-based layer, I could just as easily have chosen any other type of adjustment layer from the list. Photoshop would have stored all the information about my photo within the adjustment layer no matter which type I chose.

Let’s continue on following the same steps we used previously to edit the image. Since my image still needs a little more brightening, I’m going to duplicate my Levels adjustment layer using the same keyboard shortcut we use the duplicate a pixel-based layer, Ctrl+J (Win) / Command+J (Mac). Photoshop adds a copy of the Levels adjustment layer directly above the original and names it “Levels 1 copy”. Normally, we’d want to rename layers and give them more meaningful names, but to save us some time, I’ll just carry on. I’ll leave the blend mode of the new adjustment layer set to Screen and fine-tune the brightness of the image by lowering the Opacity of the adjustment layer to 50%, just as I did with the pixel-based layer. Notice how Photoshop allows us to do many of the same things with adjustment layers that we can do with pixel-based layers, like duplicating them, changing their blend mode and changing their opacity settings:

Lowering the opacity of the second Levels adjustment layer to 50%.

Again, we can see by looking in our document window that the results are exactly the same as if when we were using pixel-based layers. I’ve corrected the exposure of the photo using nothing more than a couple of adjustment layers, the Screen blend mode and the Opacity setting:

The exposure has been corrected once again, this time with adjustment layers.

When we were using pixel-based layers, our file size at this point had tripled from what it was originally, going from 22.8 MB up to 68.3 MB. Yet even though we’ve now added two Levels adjustment layers, our file size still hasn’t changed:

The file size of the document remains unchanged even after adding two adjustment layers.

Choosing Hue/Saturation from the list of adjustment layers.

Adjustment layers give us exactly the same options as their standard image adjustment equivalents.

The final result is exactly the same as before.

When we performed the same steps using pixel-based layers, the file size of our final result was all the way up to 91.1 MB, a considerable jump from the photo’s original size of 22.8 MB. This time, we’ve achieved the exact same final result using adjustment layers in place of the pixel-based layers, yet the file size of our Photoshop document still hasn’t increased beyond the original:

The file size of the final result remains unchanged thanks to adjustment layers.

Again, this was just a quick example of how adjustment layers can keep the file size of our Photoshop documents down to a minimum, yet even in this simple example, I still managed to shave around 68 MB off the size of my file simply by using adjustment layers in place of pixel-based layers! Of course, digital images are made up of pixels and you can’t replace every pixel-based layer in your document with an adjustment layer. But the next time you find yourself duplicating a pixel-based layer so you can apply one of Photoshop’s standard image adjustments to it like Levels, Curves or Hue/Saturation, try adding an adjustment layer instead. Photoshop and your computer will thank you for it!

And there we have it! Check out our Photo Retouching section for more Photoshop image editing tutorials!

How To Format A Storage Device In Windows 7 Using Different File Systems

In this article today I am going to describe the options that are available in the Windows’ format tool and I also going to show you how to format a storage device (Hard Drive, USB flash drive, etc) in Windows 7 using different file systems. Using the format tool in Windows can be really useful when, for example you are getting rid of an old computer or an old hard drive to prevent that personal information don’t fall easily in the wrong hands or when getting a new hard drive is a good practice to use format to check for errors. Keep reading to learn more…

For those of you that may not know, in simple words, Format in computing means to erase all the data that resides in a storage device, this could be an internal or external hard drive, USB flash drive, etc and including the creation of a file system to start clean again.

To format a hard drive or USB drive do the following:

3.  When the Format box appear you will notice that Windows recognizes:

The maximum storage capacity of the device.

The file system that the device is currently using. Depending what the application may be for the hard drive or external storage device Windows can format in one of theses file systems: NTFS, FAT32 and exFAT.

The allocation unit size, which is the cluster size. To put it in a simple words the larger the size of the clusters the faster the hard disk will be, the smaller the size of the cluster will make the hard drive slower. You will be fine using the recommended settings for normal users: 4096KB.

Also there are some default settings that you can use by pressing the Restore device defaults button.

In the Volume label you can type a name for the device.

Last we have the Format options with:

Quick format: Most the time you will use this option, but it is recommended to uncheck this option if you are formating a new storage device to enable Format to engage a deep scan and check for bad sectors — but it will take more time to finish the process –.

Create an MS-DOS startup disk: This option will create a boot disk that will allow you to boot in MS-DOS.

When you are about to format your hard drive or USB flash drive, if you don’t need specific settings just leave the defaults — in the case you need a different file system you have the support for NTFS, FAT32 and exFAT and you can easily select one from the File system menu –. Next choose a new Volume label if you wish, and like I said before it is recommended that you uncheck the Quick Format options if the storage device is new and it has never been formatted before to allow a deep scan and to check every sector for errors and of course for the creation of the file system, if not just leave the option checked. Last is the Create an MS-DOS startup disk option — don’t worry about this last option unless you need it for a really specific task –.

Once the hard drive or external storage has finished formatting you can start saving files right away. This process should also be similar if you are running Windows XP or Windows Vista.

Remember to always pay attention when using the format tool and don’t erase then data on the wrong storage device.

File Handling In C#: I/O Operations

C# has a wide array of file operations. These operations include opening a file, reading or writing to a file. There can be instances wherein you want to work with files directly, in which case you would use the file operations available in C#. Some of the basic file operations are mentioned below.

Reading – This operation is the basic read operation wherein data is read from a file.

Writing – This operation is the basic write operation wherein data is written to a file. By default, all existing contents are removed from the file, and new content is written.

Appending – This operation also involves writing information to a file. The only difference is that the existing data in a file is not overwritten. The new data to be written is added at the end of the file.

In this tutorial, you will learn-

Basics I/O Commands

The file will be a simple text file and have 2 lines as shown below

Guru99 – .Net

Guru99 -C#

For our example, we will create a simple Console application and work with our File I/O commands. The console application is the basic one which was created in the earlier tutorial. In the console application, all code is written to the chúng tôi file.

The File exists method is used to check if a particular file exists. So now let’s see the code which can be used to check if our chúng tôi file exists or not. Enter the below code in the chúng tôi file.

using System; using System.Collections.Generic; using System.IO; using System.Linq; using System.Text; using System.Threading.Tasks; namespace DemoApplication { class Tutorial { static void Main(string[] args) { String path = @"D:Example.txt"; if (File.Exists(path)) { Console.WriteLine("File Exists"); } Console.ReadKey(); } } } Code Explanation:-

First, we are setting a string variable with the path to our chúng tôi file.

Next, we use the File.Exists method to check if the file exists or not. If the File exists, a true value will be returned.

If we get a true value and the file does exist, then we write the message “File Exists” to the console.

When the above code is set, and the project is executed using Visual Studio, you will get the below output.

Output:-

From the above output, you can see that the File.Exists command was executed successfully, and the correct message was displayed in the console window.

The method is used to read all the lines one by one in a file. The lines are then stored in a string array variable. Let’s look at an example. Enter the below code in the chúng tôi file.

using System; using System.Collections.Generic; using System.IO; using System.Linq; using System.Text; using System.Threading.Tasks; namespace DemoApplication { class Tutorial { static void Main(string[] args) { String path = @"D:Example.txt"; String[] lines; lines = File.ReadAllLines(path); Console.WriteLine(lines[0]); Console.WriteLine(lines[1]); Console.ReadKey(); } } } Code Explanation:-

First, we are declaring a string array variable. This will be used to store the result which will be returned by the File.ReadAllLines method.

Next, we use the File.ReadAllLines method to read all the lines from our text file. The result is then passed to the lines variable.

Since we know that our file contains only 2 lines, we can access the value of the array variables via the lines[0] and lines[1] command.

When the above code is set, and the project is run using Visual Studio, you will get the below output.

Output:-

From the output, you can see that the File.ReadAllLines command returned both the lines from our file Example.txt

This method is used to read all the lines in a file at once. The lines are then stored in a string variable. Let’s look at an example. Enter the below code in the chúng tôi file.

using System; using System.Collections.Generic; using System.IO; using System.Linq; using System.Text; using System.Threading.Tasks; namespace DemoApplication { class Tutorial { static void Main(string[] args) { String path = @"D:Example.txt"; String lines; lines = File.ReadAllText(path); Console.WriteLine(lines); Console.ReadKey(); } } } Code Explanation:-

First, we are declaring a string variable called Lines. This will be used to store the result which will be returned by the File.ReadAllText method.

Next, we use the File.ReadAllText method to read all the lines from our text file. The result is then passed to the lines variable.

We can directly use the Console.Writeline method to display the value of the Lines variable.

When the above code is set, and the project is run using Visual Studio, you will get the below output.

Output:-

From the output, you can see that the File.ReadAlltext command returned both the lines from our file Example.txt

The method is used to make a copy of an existing file. Let’s look at an example. Enter the below code in the chúng tôi file.

using System; using System.IO; using System.Linq; using System.Text; using System.Threading.Tasks; namespace DemoApplication { class Tutorial { static void Main(string[] args) { String path = @"D:Example.txt"; String copypath = @"D:ExampleNew.txt"; File.Copy(path,copypath); Console.ReadKey(); } } } Code Explanation:-

First, we are declaring a string variable called path. This will be the location of our chúng tôi file. This file will be the source file used for the copy operation.

Next, we are declaring a string variable called copypath. This will be the location of a new file called chúng tôi file. This will be the destination file in which the contents will be written from the source file Example.txt.

We then call the chúng tôi method to copy the file chúng tôi file to the file ExampleNew.txt.

When the above code is set, and the project is run using Visual Studio, the file chúng tôi will be copied to ExampleNew.txt.

The method is used to delete an existing file. Let’s look at an example. Enter the below code in the chúng tôi file.

using System; using System.IO; using System.Linq; using System.Text; using System.Threading.Tasks; namespace DemoApplication { class Tutorial { static void Main(string[] args) { String path = @"D:Example.txt"; File.Delete(path); Console.ReadKey(); } } } Code Explanation:-

First, we are declaring a string variable called path. This will be the location of our chúng tôi file. This is the file which will be deleted.

Next, we are calling the File.Delete method to delete the file.

When the above code is set, and the project is run using Visual Studio, the file chúng tôi will be deleted from the D drive.

Summary

C# has a number of File operations which can be performed on files. Most of these operations are part of the class File.

If you want to read data from a file, you can use the File.ReadAlltext or File.ReadAllLines methods.

File Method Description

File.Exists File exists method is used to check if a particular file exists.

File.ReadAlllines The method is used to read all the lines one by one in a file.

File.ReadAllText This method is used to read all the lines in a file at once.

File.Copy The method is used to make a copy of an existing file.

File.Delete The method is used to delete an existing file.

How To Show File Extensions In Windows 11

While browsing through files in Windows 11, being able to check the file extension of them makes it much easier to find the right files on your PC or laptop. In this case, the Show file extension feature in Windows 11 comes pretty handy as it shows the file extensions of each file in the system at the end of their titles. For instance, you will see a .jpg at the end of the name of an image file and a .exe if you happen to come across an executable file on your device.

However, by default, the Show file extensions feature is disabled in Windows 11. Hence, you will not be able to see the file extensions at the end of the file names on your Windows 11 PC or laptop unless you enable it in the system. And in this in-depth guide, we will help you learn just that, with easy-to-understand, step-by-step guides. Check them out in the following sections.

Show File Extensions in Windows 11

Now, there are a few ways via which you can enable the Show file extension feature on your Windows 11 PC or laptop. This will always show the file extensions as a suffix with the file names on your device.

However, there is a way to view the file extension of files in Windows 11 without actually enabling the Show file extension feature. Check out all the details about it and the other ways to view file extensions in Windows 11 right below.

1. View File Extension in File-Info Box UI in Windows 11

Starting with the easiest way to view file extensions in Windows 11, it is via the small file information box that appears for every file on PCs and laptops. This does not require users to enable the Show file extension feature in Windows 11 and they can view the file type just by hovering the cursor over a file on their PCs and laptops.

Other than that, you can also view the side of the file, the length of a video file, and the date and time at which it was modified.

2. Enable File Name Extensions in Windows 11

Now, another way of viewing file extensions in Windows 11 is by enabling the File name extensions under the Show option in File Explorer. This will enable the Show file extension feature on your Windows 11 PC or laptop and you will be able to view the file extensions of each of the files at the end of their names on your device.

You can follow the steps right below to enable the File name extensions feature in File Explorer on your Windows 11 PC or laptop:

1. Use Windows + E to open File Explorer on your Windows 11 PC or laptop.

4. Once you execute all the above steps on your Windows 11 PC or laptop, you will be able to view the file extensions of every file at the end of their names.

However, if you do not want the file extensions to be shown at the end of the file names on your Windows 11 PC or laptop, you can always disable the File name extensions option under the Show menu in File Explorer using the above steps.

3. Disable Hide Extensions for Known File Types in Windows 11

One other way of enabling the Show file extension feature on Windows 11 PCs and laptops involves disabling a certain setting within the Folder Options settings menu.

You can check out the steps right below to disable the said setting in Folder Options on your Windows 11 PC or laptop and view the file extensions of every known and unknown file type on your device:

1. Use Windows + E to launch File Explorer on your Windows 11 PC or laptop.

3. Now, in the Folder Options window, go to the View tab on the top navigation bar.

4. Next, under the Advanced settings section, uncheck the Hide extensions for known file types option on the list.

5. Hit the Apply button below to save the change on your device.

Following this setting change in Windows 11, you will be able to view the file extensions of every known and unknown file type as a suffix to their names on your PC or laptop.

4. Enable Show File Extensions via Command Prompt in Windows 11

The Show file extensions feature in Windows 11 can also be enabled via the Command Prompt tool on your PC or laptop. However, this should be treated as a last resort method to enable the said feature in Windows 11 and should only be used when the above methods fail to show the file extensions on your device.

You can follow the steps right below to enable the Show file extension feature in Windows 11 via the Command Prompt tool on your PC or laptop:

1. Use Windows + S to open Windows search on your PC or laptop and type in cmd.

4. Once the Command Prompt tool launches, type in or copy-paste the following command and press Enter:

reg add HKCUSoftwareMicrosoftWindowsCurrentVersionExplorerAdvanced /v HideFileExt /t REG_DWORD /d 0 /f.

5. Wait for the command to execute.

6. Exit the Command Prompt window after the process is completed.

You will not be able to see the file extensions for every file on your Windows 11 PC or laptop.

FAQs

What are file extensions in Windows 11?

File extensions, such as .jpg or .mp3, depict the type of files that are stored on Windows 11 PCs and laptops. These extensions essentially allow users to identify a file type and choose the relevant app or program to open the file on their Windows 11 device.

What are some examples of file extensions?

Examples of file extensions include .jpg, .jpeg, .mp3, .mp4. .exe, .json, .mkv, .mov, .doc, .docx, and many others.

Are file extensions visible by default in Windows 11?

No, file extensions are not visible by default in Windows 11. Users need to enable the File name extensions feature under the Show settings in Windows Explorer to view the file extensions of every file on their PCs or laptops.

How to turn off file extensions in Windows 11?

If users do not want to view the file extensions for the files on their Windows 11 PCs or laptops, they can disable the File name extensions option under the Show settings in File Explorer.

Now You Can Easily Show File Extensions in Windows 11!

So, there you have it! This was all about how to show file extensions in Windows 11 to easily identify file types while browsing through them in File Explorer on your PC or laptop. We hope this guide helps you enable the said setting on your PC or laptop and that you are able to view the file extensions of all your files in Windows 11.

If you want to learn how you can show or hide file extensions on Macs, running macOS 13 Ventura, you can check out the linked article.

Fix: Rdr File System Error In Windows 10

FIX: RDR FILE SYSTEM error in Windows 10

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The most common cause for the RDR_FILE_SYSTEM error in Windows 10 is software incompatibility or faulty hardware.

To avoid this issue, make sure to have the latest drivers and Windows updates.

You can try running the Windows 10 built-in troubleshooter tool dedicated to BSoD problems.

The chkdsk command is another solution to resolve the RDR_FILE_SYSTEM blue screen error.

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Computer errors are relatively common, and for the most part, these errors aren’t usually serious.

Blue Screen of Death errors, on the other hand, can be caused by faulty hardware, therefore it’s crucial to fix these errors as soon as possible.

Since BSoD errors are a serious issue, today we’re going to show you how to fix the RDR_FILE_SYSTEM error on Windows 10.

The complete error message you can see before the computer restarts is:  Stop Code RDR_FILE_SYSTEM/ What failed: mrxsmb20.sys.

How can I fix the RDR_FILE_SYSTEM BSoD error?

The most common cause for BSoD error is software or hardware incompatibility, and you can avoid most of the compatibility issues by downloading the Windows updates regularly.

Using an automatic driver updater will certainly save you from the hassle of searching for drivers manually, and it will always keep your system up to date with the latest drivers.

Sometimes, malfunctioning drivers can cause multiple system errors.

If this happens to your PC, you may need to update or reinstall certain drivers entirely. As the process is not quite straightforward, we recommend using a reliable driver updater for the job. Here’s how to do it:

Download and install Outbyte Driver Updater.

Launch the software.

Wait for the app to detect all faulty drivers.

Now, it will show you all the malfunctioning drivers listed to select the ones to Update or Ignore.

Restart your PC to ensure the applied changes.

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Disclaimer: this program needs to be upgraded from the free version in order to perform some specific actions.

2. Run the BSoD Troubleshooter 

If you’re still facing the problem after updating your drivers, let’s try a few troubleshooting solutions.

First and foremost, try using the built-in Windows 10 BSOD troubleshooter. The tool is equipped to deal with various BSOD issues, including the RDR_FILE_SYSTEM error.

If you are not satisfied with the results or want to save some time, you also have the alternative to use a third-party BSoD fixer. This type of tool will scan your system and identify all error-causing problems.

3. Run the SFC scan

Go to Search, type cmd, and open Command Prompt as Administrator.

Enter the following line and press Enter: sfc/scannow

Wait until the process is done (it may take a while).

If the solution is found, it will automatically be applied.

Now, close the Command Prompt and restart your computer.

This is a command-line tool that goes through your system seeking potential issues. If the solution is possible, the SFC scan will resolve the problem automatically.

If you encounter any problems while running SFC, it stops or does not work at all on Windows 10, you can use our dedicated guide in order to solve the error.

4. Run the DISM tool

Follow the first two steps from the above solution to open

 Command Prompt 

as admin.

Paste the following command and press Enter:

DISM /Online /Cleanup-Image /RestoreHealth

Wait until the scan is finished.

Restart your computer and try updating again.

And the final troubleshooter we’re going to use is DISM. Deployment Image Servicing and Management (DISM) deploys the system image all over again, resolving potential issues along the way.

There are times when the DISM tool fails on Windows 10. If this happens to you, we recommend you check our dedicated guide to fix the error.

5. Uninstall/reinstall your antivirus software

It was reported by users that Norton antivirus can often cause RDR_FILE_SYSTEM error to occur. Apparently, Norton has some minor issues with Windows 10.

Expert tip:

Many antivirus companies offer uninstaller tools for their software, so make sure to download them and use them to completely remove a certain antivirus.

After you’ve uninstalled your antivirus software, you can reinstall it again, but be sure to use the latest version, since the latest version will probably have most of the older bugs fixed.

Alternatively, if the error does not appear after you uninstall it, we recommend you install another antivirus program.

6. Remove any recently installed software

RDR_FILE_SYSTEM BSoD error can be caused by incompatible software, and if you recently installed any third-party software, that software can be the cause of this error.

Most commonly BSoD errors are caused by antivirus, VPN, or overclocking software, so if you’re using any of those, make sure that you uninstall them.

In some rare cases, even recently installed drivers can cause BSoD errors to appear. If you installed any new drivers in the past, make sure to remove them or roll back to the previous version.

7. Run the chkdsk command

In certain cases, these errors can be caused by corrupted files and folders on your hard drive, therefore you need to perform a chkdsk command.

If Automatic Repair couldn’t repair your Windows 10 PC, you can take a look at our dedicated guide and easily solve the error.

8. Check your hardware

Download MemTest86+.

Burn the tool to a CD or create a bootable USB flash drive.

Connect the CD or USB flash drive and boot your PC from it.

Let the MemTest86+ run for a couple of hours.

If any errors are found, it means that one or more RAM modules are corrupt and that you need to replace it.

Often the cause for RDR_FILE_SYSTEM is faulty hardware, most commonly RAM. Users reported that after replacing the faulty RAM module, the issue was permanently fixed.

In order to check your RAM, follow the above steps. In addition to RAM, almost any other hardware component can cause this BSoD error to appear.

It’s also worth mentioning that any recently installed hardware can cause an RDR_FILE_SYSTEM BSoD error if that hardware isn’t fully compatible with your motherboard.

To diagnose the problem, you should replace recently added hardware and check if your PC works without it.

RDR_FILE_SYSTEM BSoD error can create certain problems on Windows 10, but you can fix this error easily by following one of our solutions.

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