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Every component in React has a lifecycle that incorporates several phases. Programmers usually think of this lifecycle as the component’s ‘lifetime’. The components experience the following events: Mounting, Updating, Unmounting, and Error handling. Mounting refers to the procedure of adding nodes and updating requires programmers to alter and change these nodes in the DOM. Unmounting, on the other hand, removes nodes and error handling tracks your code to ensure it works and is bug-free.

These occurrences can be compared to a component’s birth, development, and eventual demise. You can override multiple lifecycle methods in each React lifecycle phase to execute code at particular points in the process. With this in mind, let’s shed some light on how to add the above lifecycle methods to a Class component in ReactJS.

Detailed Insights On React Lifecycle Methods

As you know, mounting, updating, and unmounting are primary React Lifecycle methods. The methods used in each phase make it simpler to carry out common operations on the components. React developers can directly extend from React Component with class-based components to access the methods.

The most popular method for managing lifecycle events needed ES6 class-based components prior to React 16.8. In other words, if our code were already written using functional React components, we would need to rewrite those as classes that extend with React.Component and include a specific render function.

The three most popular lifecycle methods, componentDidMount, componentDidUpdate, and componentWillUnmount, could be accessed only then.

How To Use Local State And Extra Features With Ease?

In order to use local state along with extra features in React, you will first have to convert a functional complement to a class component.

Create a React.Component extending ES6 class of the same name

Add an empty method render().

Place the function’s body in the render() method.

Substitute props in the render() body with this.props

Delete any remaining empty function declarations.

render

(

)

{

return

(

)

;

}

Adding Lifecycle Methods to a Class Component

For applications that incorporate a multitude of components, it’s imperative to free up resources. When the clock is first shown to the DOM, we want to start a timer. The React term for this is “mounting.” Additionally, once the DOM created by the clock is deleted, we want to reset that timer. In React, this is referred to as “unmounting.”

Example

import

react from ‘react’

;

class

Clock

extends

React

.

Component

{

constructor

(

props

)

{

super

(

props

)

;

this

.

state

=

{

date

:

new

Date

(

)

}

;

}

componentDidMount

(

)

{

}

componentWillUnmount

(

)

{

}

render

(

)

{

return

(

)

;

}

}

Output Hello, world! It is 10:27:03 AM.

Successfully rendering the component’s output invokes a particular function. This is the componentDidMount() function. Insert a timer here −

componentDidMount

(

)

{

this

.

timerID

=

setInterval

(

1000

)

;

}

It is further possible to insert more fields manually to the Class component. Programmers usually do this when they need to keep something which wasn’t a part of the data flow. Reg despite ReactJS setting up this.state and this.props by itself. These further possess unique meanings like a timer ID. In the lifecycle function componentWillUnmount(), we shall deactivate the timer −

componentWillUnmount

(

)

{

clearInterval

(

this

.

timerID

)

;

}

The Clock component will execute the tick() method, which we will implement last, once every second. It will employ this. To program updates to the component’s local state, use setState() −

Example

class

Clock

extends

React

.

Component

{

constructor

(

props

)

{

super

(

props

)

;

this

.

state

=

{

date

:

new

Date

(

)

}

;

}

componentDidMount

(

)

{

this

.

timerID

=

setInterval

(

1000

)

;

}

componentWillUnmount

(

)

{

clearInterval

(

this

.

timerID

)

;

}

tick

(

)

{

this

.

setState

(

{

date

:

new

Date

(

)

}

)

;

}

render

(

)

{

return

(

)

;

}

}

const

root

=

ReactDOM

.

createRoot

(

document

.

getElementById

(

'root'

)

)

;

Output Hello, world! It is 10:30:12 AM. The clock is now ticking every second. Using State Correctly

You should be aware of three aspects concerning setState().

Do Not Modify State Directly

This won’t re-render a component, for example −

Instead

,

use

setState

(

)

:

Only the constructor is capable of assigning this.state.

State Updates May Be Asynchronous

You shouldn’t use this.props, and this.state’s values to determine the next state because they might be modified asynchronously. For example, the following code won’t be applicable while updating the counter −

this

.

setState

(

{

counter

:

this

.

state

.

counter

+

this

.

props

.

increment

,

}

)

;

Instead, refer to other versions of setState() and utilize the one which accepts functions. This is because a few versions see functions as an object that requires fixing. The previous state will be passed as the first argument to that method, and the props present at the moment the update is applied will be passed as the second argument −

counter

:

state

.

counter

+

props

.

increment

}

)

)

;

Although we used an arrow function in the example above, normal functions also work −

this

.

setState

(

function

(

state

,

props

)

{

return

{

counter

:

state

.

counter

+

props

.

increment

}

;

}

)

;

State Updates are Merged

Your state might include a number of independent variables −

constructor

(

props

)

{

super

(

props

)

;

this

.

state

=

{

posts

:

[

]

,

}

;

}

After that, you may update each one separately using different setState() calls −

componentDidMount

(

)

{

this

.

setState

(

{

posts

:

response

.

posts

}

)

;

}

)

;

this

.

setState

(

{

}

)

;

}

)

;

}

Thus, the state component is often considered local or contained. Other than the component that owns and controls it, no other component has access to it.

Bottom Line

We have discussed everything you need to know to add lifecycle methods correctly to Class Components in React. Many programmers generally encounter several difficulties while doing the same because of the codes and technicality involved. Therefore, make sure to follow the steps correctly and cross-check your codes before running a command.

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How To Add Tag Input In Reactjs?

We can add a tag input in NextJS by creating a new component for the input field and using the onChange event to handle the inputted tags. We can also use the state to store the tags and display them as they are inputted. Finally, we can add a button or function to submit the final tag list. Let us first understand what is ReactJS and Tag Input.

ReactJS

React is a JavaScript library for building user interfaces. It makes it easy to create interactive UIs. Design simple views for each state in your application, and React will efficiently update and render the right components when your data changes. You can also build encapsulated components that manage their own state, then compose them to make complex UIs.

Both small and large, complicated applications can be created with ReactJS. It offers a basic yet reliable feature set to get a web application off the ground. It is easy to master both contemporary and legacy applications and is a faster method of coding a functionality. React provides high quantity of ready-made components readily available.

Tag Input

A tag input is a UI element that allows users to add tags or keywords to an input field. These tags are often used for categorizing or grouping related items, and can be used for search or filtering purposes.

A tag input typically has an input field where users can type in tags, and a button to add the tags to a list. The tags can then be displayed as individual elements, usually with a close button to allow users to remove tags. Some tag inputs also have autocomplete functionality to suggest existing tags as the user types.

To get started first create a new NextJS app and run it on our dev server like this −

npx create-react-app tag-app cd tag-app npm start Approach

Install the react-tag-input library by running the following command in your terminal −

npm install react-tag-input

Import the library in your component file by adding the following line at the top of the file −

import { TagInput } from 'react-tag-input';

Create a state variable to hold the tags, and initialize it with an empty array −

const [tags, setTags] = useState([]);

Add the TagInput component to your JSX code and pass in the tags state variable and a callback function for handling tag changes −

(Optional) You can also customize the TagInput component by passing in additional props such as placeholders and styling. For example, to change the placeholder text for the input field, you can add the following prop −

Use the tags state variable in your component logic as needed. For example, you can display the tags in a list or use them as input for an API call −

That’s it! You now have a functional tag input in your ReactJS project.

Example import React, { useState } from 'react'; import { render } from 'react-dom'; import { COUNTRIES } from './countries'; import './style.css'; import { WithContext as ReactTags } from 'react-tag-input'; return { id: country, text: country, }; }); const KeyCodes = { comma: 188, enter: 13, }; const [tags, setTags] = React.useState([ { id: 'Thailand', text: 'Thailand' }, { id: 'India', text: 'India' }, { id: 'Vietnam', text: 'Vietnam' }, { id: 'Turkey', text: 'Turkey' }, ]); }; setTags([...tags, tag]); }; const newTags = tags.slice(); newTags.splice(currPos, 1); newTags.splice(newPos, 0, tag); setTags(newTags); }; }; return ( <ReactTags tags={tags} suggestions={suggestions} delimiters={delimiters} handleDelete={handleDelete} handleAddition={handleAddition} handleDrag={handleDrag} inputFieldPosition="bottom" autocomplete editable ); }; Output

How To Win At Customer Lifecycle Marketing

Being a marketer can be exhausting. As if it wasn’t hard enough to attract new customers, now everyone’s talking about optimizing the entire customer lifecycle. (We’re tired just thinking about it!)

If you’re trying to understand customer lifecycle marketing, grab a coffee and read on: we’re here to remedy your marketing overwhelm. In this blog post, we explain why you need to work across the entire customer journey, and how to do it well.

What is customer lifecycle marketing?

Customer lifecycle marketing is about making every touchpoint between a customer and a brand more profitable.

A customer’s lifecycle describes their journey through the buying cycle. It includes every interaction they have with your brand along the way. And covers every marketing channel those interactions happen on.

Creating a customer lifecycle marketing strategy helps you optimize each and every customer interaction. The aim is to build a stronger relationship that will increase revenue.

Stages of customer lifecycle marketing

So, what are the different stages of the customer lifecycle and which tactics are most relevant at each stage?

Attraction

Creating content based on things people are searching for (that relate to your offering) is a great way to get discovered.

If your content meets search intentions well, you will attract organic traffic to your website. Make sure you meet informational needs rather than pushing your product.

Here’s a strong example of attractive content from Airbnb. It meets the needs of people searching for “things to do in Berlin”:

Creating content that’s found through search gets you in front of customers at the beginning of their journey to purchase. When they do start comparing purchase options, you’ll be top of mind.

Consideration 

The consideration stage of the customer lifecycle is when customers consider purchase options. You want to get them to form a preference for your brand.

Content types that help include welcome campaigns, ratings and reviews, and product descriptions.

A welcome campaign is an automated series of emails, triggered when someone subscribes. It enables you to position your products in bite-sized chunks and entice your customer to purchase.smart

Here’s a welcome email example from Office that we love. It’s benefit-led, it encourages social engagement, and it introduces popular brands:

Reviews and ratings are another useful tool you can use at the consideration stage. They act as social proof and help customers assess whether a product is a safe choice.

Conversion

Now you need to persuade your customers to purchase from you. Product recommendations, cart abandonment campaigns, and calls-to-action are your tools to do this.

Here’s an example of a tempting cart abandonment email from Kate Spade that would have enticed us back to buy:

Retention

The retention stage of the customer lifecycle is your chance to build loyalty and retain customers.

Try using loyalty schemes, product recommendations, or VIP discounts at this stage.

Advocacy Win-back

The win-back stage is when you employ tactics to win back any lapsed customers. Re-engagement email campaigns are an effective way to win-back those sleeping subscribers.

Reminding people what you have to offer is a pragmatic way to approach this. Here’s a great example of this tactic in action from Boden:

Why does post-purchase marketing matter?

Conversions are not the end of the customer’s lifecycle. They are only the midpoint.

These tactics help you shape post-purchase behaviour (the way a customer thinks, feels, and acts after they have bought something).

It’s common for customers to feel anxious after a purchase. They’ve just parted with their hard-earned money. Naturally, they question if they spent it well.

Post-purchase marketing is your tool to influence how your customer feels about their purchase. Done well, you can use post-purchase marketing to:

make customers feel good about their purchase

increase the likelihood your customer will buy from you again

How to win at post-purchase marketing

Email marketing is an ideal post-purchase marketing channel. With the right technology in place, you can set up automated emails that are triggered when a customer buys from you.

Here are some essential post-purchase email marketing ideas to get you started:

Thank you

Thanking your customers for their purchase builds rapport and makes them feel good about what they’ve just bought.

Here’s a bold and simple post-purchase thank you example from Abercrombie & Finch:

Refund policy and returns

Send an email to remind customers of your refund policy and clearly explain your returns policy. This helps to reduce post-purchase anxiety.

How-to guides

It’s frustrating when you can’t work out how to use something you just bought.

Email a how-to guide to help your customers use their purchase. This will improve their experience and reduces the risk that they’ll regret buying from you.

Product care tips

Some customers worry they’ll have to replace their purchase so soon it won’t be worth the money.

Send a care guide so your customers know how to look after their product. This reassures them it will last for a while and offer good value. 

Product recommendations

Email personalized recommendations for complementary products. This helps your customers get the most out of their purchase.

Here’s an example of how to do post-purchase product recommendations well from Best Buy:

Loyalty programme

Show your customers you value their custom by inviting them to become part of your loyalty programme. This is a great way to encourage frequent purchasing.

Product satisfaction feedback

Asking for feedback helps you improve your customer experience and shows customers you care.

Make sure you time feedback requests well to get the best response rate. This will depend on when the customer will have had a chance to use the product. 

Social media and user-generated content

Get customers to post lifestyle snaps of their new purchase to inspire others to buy. This helps you build a bank of user-generated visual content to use for future campaigns. 

Refer a friend

Offer your customers the chance to refer a friend in return for a discount. This helps you increase your customer base and boost your revenue.

Replenishment

Prompt customers to re-order before their product runs out with an automated replenishment email.

This ensures they aren’t left in the lurch (and that they don’t buy from a competitor).

Learn more by reading Pure360’s best practice guide to post-purchase marketing.

Takeaway

We hope this post has helped you learn about customer lifecycle marketing and given you some ideas to play with.

To implement the strategies we’ve explored, you’ll need the right marketing automation technology in place. That’s where we come in.

How To Add A Tattoo In Photoshop (Step By Step)

You can easily add a tattoo in Photoshop, whether you want to have a little fun with an image of your own or if a client has asked to see how body art would look on them.

In this tutorial, you’ll learn how to add a tattoo in two different ways. The first method works with a black tattoo, while the second method explains how to add a realistic color tattoo.

How To Turn A Photo Into A Tattoo In Photoshop

Follow these steps to add a standard black tattoo to a subject. Before you begin, you need to prepare two images. 

The first image should be of your subject with enough skin showing in the area you want to place the tattoo, which will depend on the size and shape of the tattoo. The second image you need is the tattoo artwork itself. This photo should only have the tattoo design on a transparent background.

If you need to remove the background from the tattoo image, choose one of these background removal techniques and do this step before continuing with the tutorial. I will be using the following two images for this example.

Step 1: Open The Body Image And The Tattoo Image In One Document

Then, add the second image by dragging and dropping the photo from your files onto the first image open in Photoshop. The tattoo image will be added as a new layer and may be too small or too big when added.

When you add the tattoo image, the Transform Tool should be automatically active, shown by the blue block and white anchor points surrounding the layer. If the tool isn’t active, press Control + T (Win) or Command + T (Mac) to turn it on. You can then use the anchor points to resize the tattoo.

Then, use the Move Tool (V) to place the tattoo over the spot where you want it on the body. 

Don’t worry if some edges of the tattoo cover other parts or go off the body. You can hide these areas later where other body parts hide the tattoo or if it should disappear around a curve of the body.

Step 2: Convert The Tattoo Layer To A Smart Object

Once the tattoo layer is in place on the body, convert it to a smart object. This step is necessary so you can add the filters as smart filters and go back and edit them at any stage in the process.

You will know the layer is a smart object when you see the icon in the layer thumbnail.

Note: Dragging and dropping an image into a document sometimes automatically converts the layer to a smart object, so in that case, you can skip this step.

Step 3: Apply The Liquify Filter

Once you have converted the layer to a smart object, you can access and use the Liquify Tool. This filter allows you to warp the tattoo to fit over the body part you have placed it on. 

The amount you need to warp the tattoo depends on where you place the tattoo. When adding a tattoo to curved areas, such as arms and legs, you must pay extra attention.

Once you are in the Liquify workspace, you will see tools on the left-hand side, the tattoo in the preview box in the middle, and additional settings in the right-hand panel.

Before you start warping the tattoo, you can adjust the viewing options to view the background image while you adjust the tattoo. 

To do this, scroll to the bottom of the panel on the right and open the View Options tab. Then, check the box next to Show Backdrop, set the Use to Background, the Mode to Behind, and the Opacity to 50.

You will now see the background image with the tattoo on top of it in the preview window, so you can see what the final effect will look like.

Next, you can warp and adjust the tattoo as needed to fit on the skin underneath it by following the shape and curves. You can switch between using the Forward Warp Tool (W), the Pucker Tool (S), and the Bloat Tool (B) to distort the tattoo.

The Bloat Tool creates a balloon-like effect on the areas you brush over to bloat the image, the Pucker Tool contracts the areas to make it look further away from the camera, and the warp tool pulls the parts of the image in different directions to curve it.

Only make subtle changes to keep the tattoo looking realistic. This is how my tattoo looks after bloating and puckering it. 

Step 4: Add A Layer Mask To The Tattoo To Remove The Excess Tattoo

If parts of the tattoo should be hidden because of things that would be covering a real tattoo or on the side of arms and legs, you can hide these areas with a layer mask. In my example, the man’s hand and a bit of the shirt would cover parts of the tattoo.

Then, select the Brush Tool (B) and set the foreground color to black (when dealing with layer masks, black hides, and white reveals).

Then, use the Brush Preset Picker panel from the Options Bar to set the brush size and select a Soft Round Brush.

Brush over the areas to hide parts of the tattoo while increasing and decreasing the brush size to hide tricky areas.

Keep brushing until all the parts of the tattoo are hidden around other objects.

Step 5: Use The Blend If Function To Blend The Tattoo Into The Skin

Since the tattoo is too bold, it still looks fake. You can blend the tattoo into the skin using the Blend If sliders to fix this.

This will open the Layer Styles panel, where you can add various effects to objects. You can stay in the Blending Options tab and look near the bottom to find the Underlying Layer slider under the Blend If section.

Move the Layer Styles window to the side of the workspace to see the tattoo as you adjust the sliders. Then, to blend the tattoo layer into the background layer where the highlights are, you will slide the point on the right into the middle.

However, you need to feather the blending to prevent it from removing the tattoo completely. To feather the blend, hold in Alt (Win) or Option (Mac) and drag the slider to the center. You will see the base point break apart.

Move the two points separately to blend the tattoo into the highlights, then repeat this for the shadows while watching the tattoo on the image to ensure an accurate blend.

Step 6: Blur The Tattoo Layer With A Gaussian Blur Filter

Since the tattoo looks too perfect and smooth, which is not the case with real tattoos because of the pores on a person’s skin, you need to reduce the smoothness.

Step 7: Decrease The Opacity Of The Tattoo Layer

Your tattoo is almost complete, but if it is still too bold and unrealistic, you can blend it into the background more by lowering the Opacity. 

Find the Opacity slider in the Layers Panel and reduce the tattoo layer’s opacity to between 60% and 75%.

You have now added a black tattoo to your image.

Since you converted the tattoo to a smart object, you can edit any filters and quickly adjust the tattoo. For instance, I needed to tilt the tattoo upwards slightly (so the lady is looking upwards) using the Transform Tool. Adjust the effects and positioning until you are happy with the result.

Before After

How To Apply A Realistic Color Tattoo In Photoshop

If you want to add a color tattoo to a person’s body, the steps are similar to the previous method, with a few differences. I will summarize the effects explained in the first method, so refer back if you need to understand more.

I will be adding this colorful fish tattoo onto the image of a woman’s back.

Step 1: Open Both Images And Convert The Tattoo Layer To A Smart Object

Open both images in one document in Photoshop with the tattoo layer on top. Ensure the tattoo image has a transparent background. Refer to the first section for guidance if needed.

You can also use the Transform Tool to resize the tattoo and the Move Tool (V) to place it where you want it on the body.

Step 2: Change The Tattoo Blend Mode To Multiple

To blend any unrealistic areas of the tattoo into the body, change the blend mode of the tattoo layer to Multiply.

To change the blend mode, find the drop-down menu in the Layers Panel that says Normal, as that is the default blend mode of every layer.

You will notice the white areas of the tattoo disappear, and it looks more blended into the background.

Step 3: Use The Liquify Filter To Place The Tattoo

You can also refer to Step 4 in the previous section if you need to remove parts of the tattoo that should be hidden in the image. I don’t need to add this step to my example.

Step 4: Add A Gaussian Blur To Blur The Tattoo Step 5: Duplicate The Background Layer And Desaturate It

The most important step when adding a color tattoo onto a subject is to add a slight bit of noise. 

The image will turn black and white; remember that the tattoo will be hidden at this stage.

Step 6: Change The Duplicated Layer’s Blend Mode To Screen

To blend the noise effect better, you need to change the blend mode of the Noise layer to Screen. 

To change the blend mode, select the Noise layer, locate the drop-down menu next to Normal in the Layers Panel, and change the mode to Screen.

The image will turn bright, and you should see the tattoo a bit at this stage.

Since we only want the noise effect applied to the tattoo, you must clip the Noise layer to the tattoo layer, which should be directly below it. 

You will notice the Noise layer has the arrow pointing down to confirm the clipping mask is applied, and the effect only shows on the tattoo now.

Step 7: Add A Noise Filter To The Duplicated Layer

I will show you how to reduce the intensity of the effect in the next step, so don’t worry if the tattoo doesn’t look realistic at this stage. 

Step 8: Reduce The Opacity Of The Noise Layer

Adding noise to the tattoo has caused it to look faded, but you can easily reduce the intensity of the Noise layer by dropping its opacity.

Select the Noise layer, locate the Opacity slider in the Layers Panel, and reduce it to around 35% to 50%.

You have now added a realistic color tattoo to your subject.

Before After

With these two techniques, you can add a black and white or color tattoo onto your subjects in just a few minutes to see how the real thing would look.

Happy Editing!

How To Add A Drop Shadow To Text And Images In Photoshop

When you want to add a drop shadow to text or images in Photoshop, it’s not immediately obvious how to do it. That’s because drop shadow effects are hidden within the layer styles settings.

Now there are a variety of effects that you can use to improve the look of your drop shadows in Photoshop. Whether you want a simple black shadow or want to spice it up with color, it’s all done easily in the layer styles dialogue box. In this tutorial, you’ll gain an in-depth look at the step-by-step process of creating drop shadows, along with some helpful tips to make your shadows look exactly as you envision!

How To Add A Drop Shadow In Photoshop

Step 1: Highlight The Text Or Image Layer

In this example, I’ll be adding a drop shadow to text, but the same steps apply with an image layer.

The easiest way to add a layer effect in Photoshop is via the FX icon found at the bottom of your layers panel.

The drop shadow will be applied to your selected text or image layer, but there are still some additional settings left to adjust!

Step 3: Adjust The Drop Shadow Position

After selecting the drop shadow option, the layer styles dialogue box will open to reveal your shadow settings. The first order of business is to adjust the position of the drop shadow. This is easily done using the angle adjustment.

For example, the white line is pointed downwards, indicating which side the light is shining from, creating a shadow on the text’s upper side. This works the same for anywhere you position the light angle.

Your second option is to simply type in the exact angle you want the shadow to be at. By typing in 45°, for example, it will adjust the light angle accordingly.

Both options work equally well to change your drop shadow’s position, but the light source adjustment makes it easier since you can experiment more.

Step 4: Refine The Look Of The Shadow

Now that the drop shadow is at the angle you’re looking for; it’s time to adjust the look of your drop shadow. Below the angle adjustment are three sliders called Distance, Spread, and Size; let’s break down what each of them does.

Distance: This adjustment controls how far your shadow is from your text or image. The greater your distance, the more disconnected the drop shadow and layer will become.

Spread: This controls how broad your drop shadow is in relation to your layer. With a text layer drop shadow, for example, a larger spread will thicken each letter’s shadow’s look.

Size: The size setting operates a lot like the feather adjustment of the Brush Tool. With a larger size, the edges of your drop shadow will become increasingly soft.

There is no right or wrong way of adjusting these sliders, so just experiment with each one until you’re happy with the look of the drop shadow.

How To Change The Color Of A Drop Shadow In Photoshop

There are additional ways to adjust the look of the color with the blending mode or opacity. In most cases, it’s best to leave the blending mode set to “Normal.”

As for opacity, you can change the drop shadow’s transparency by bringing this up or down. With a 0% opacity, the drop shadow will be completely invisible, while at 100% opacity, it will be fully visible. If you are going for a subtle drop shadow, try lowering the opacity to quickly soften the intensity of the drop shadow.

How To Create Long Drop Shadows In Photoshop

Now unlike a regular drop shadow, long drop shadows stretch out from your image or text much further while still remaining connected. Unfortunately, there isn’t a way to create long drop shadows using the techniques you’ve learned so far. Luckily, they’re still easy to create using the steps outlined below.

To make long shadows in Photoshop, first, duplicate your text. Select the bottom layer and press Command/Control + T to angle the text to match the desired shadow. Commit to your changes, then hold Alt/Option + upward arrow key to duplicate the angled text 100 times. Once complete, merge the duplicate layers and move them behind your original text.

Step 1: Duplicate Your Text Or Image Layer

Depending on whether you want to create a long shadow on text or an image, the steps will vary slightly at the beginning. With that said, this step remains the same for both situations. With your text or image layer highlighted, press Command/Control + J (Mac/PC) to duplicate the layer.

Step 2: Change The Color Of The Bottom Layer

Before you create the long drop shadow, let’s pick a color. In the case of text, select the text layer, open the character panel, and pick a new text color.

With the selection still active, press Alt/Option + Delete (PC/Mac) to fill the selection with the foreground color. Then press Command/Control + D (Mac/PC) to deselect the image layer.

Step 3: Adjust The Angle Of Your Text Or Image

Since you are working with the underlying layer, you should see the angled layer beneath your duplicated layer.

Step 4: Duplicate The Angled Layer 100 Times

100 times?! Are you crazy?!

This might seem like a lot, but there is an easy keyboard shortcut you can use to do this in seconds. With the underlying angled layer selected, make sure to activate the Move Tool by pressing V. Now, press and hold Alt/Option + Up Arrow Key to duplicate and move your layer continuously.

By holding this shortcut, Photoshop will continue to duplicate and move your layer to eventually create a long shadow. After about 100 copies, you’re left with enough to work with for this effect.

Step 5: Merge The Duplicated Layers

Ah, peace and order have been restored to the layers panel.

Step 6: Correct The Angle Of The Long Shadow

Now you have a long shadow, but it doesn’t match up with your text or image. By pressing Command/Control + T (Mac/PC), go back to the rotate setting and enter your original input’s negative value. Since I set the rotation angle to 45° previously, I’ll now set it to -45° to correct it.

Step 7: Reposition The Long Shadow

Your long drop shadow may be a bit off from your text or image, so reposition is by selecting the Move Tool (V) and dragging it into place.

Step 8: Duplicate & Extend The Long Shadow

If you are happy with the size of your long shadow, then your work is done. However, you can further extend the shadow by duplicating and moving the layer. With the long shadow layer selected, press Command/Control + J (Mac/PC) to duplicate it. Using the Move Tool (V), reposition the duplicated long shadow to extend off the previous one.

Rinse and repeat these steps, duplicating and repositioning, until the long shadow is extended as much as you want.

Now you’ve successfully created a long drop shadow in Photoshop on a text or image layer! From here, you can further stylize your graphic by changing the background color or even adding a gradient!

With the tips outlined here, you’re equipped to take on any drop shadow effect with ease. Whether you want standard drop shadows added to your text or take things further with a long drop shadow on your images, it’s all done in a few easy steps. Drop shadows are a great way to stylize your graphics but also make them pop from the background. Another worthy option for making things stand out from the background is by outlining your text, images, or cutouts. You can learn exactly how to outline your images in this next tutorial!

Happy Editing,

Brendan 🙂

How To Add A Watermark To Your Word Documents

If you often use Word, you probably have seen or received a document with the words “Do Not Copy” or “Confidential” printed lightly in the background of a document. That’s a watermark, which is a text or a picture that appears behind the contents of a document.

Usually, a watermark will lay down the constraints of a document or identify a company. Adding a watermark to a Word document is an easy and straightforward process. In this post you’ll learn how to add a watermark to your Word documents.

Why Would I Want to Watermark a Word Document?

Adding a watermark to your documents can be very useful, especially when you want to communicate the nature of your business. Many people add a watermark to maintain the uniqueness of a document. In some instances, a watermark may be required for security or legal reasons.

You can also watermark a document with your company’s logo to enhance the visibility of your brand. At times you may want an urgent customer response regarding an invoice or a query. In such cases, sending an mail with a document marked as “Urgent” can help to better convey your message.

Also, when you share a document online, there is a chance that its contents may be duplicated (stolen) or its credibility compromised. Marking the document as “Do Not Copy” or adding your company’s logo can help you to maintain the originality of your work. This can also help to prevent your work from being used for commercial purposes without your consent.

How to Add a Watermark to Your Word Documents

To add a text watermark to a Word document, simply follow the steps below. Note that you can add a watermark to a new or an existing document. In this post we’ll add a watermark to an existing document.

1. Open an existing Word document and make sure the view is set to “Print Layout” or “Full-Screen Reading.” You won’t be able to set a watermark if the view is set to “Web Layout” or “Outline View.”

This will open up a gallery of predefined text watermarks such as Confidential, Do Not Copy, Draft, and Urgent – all in different styles. You’ll find more if you scroll down.

How to Add a Custom Watermark to Your Word Document

At times you may want to set a picture or a company’s logo as your watermark. You may also want to create a unique text other than the predefined ones provided by Word. To do so, follow the steps below.

2. This will open the “Printed Watermark” dialogue box. Here you will find many options for customizing your watermark.

Wrapping Up

Adding a watermark to your Word documents not only allows you to exercise full control over your content but also lets you portray a higher level of professionalism. By following this guide you should be able to add both built-in and custom watermarks to your Word documents. Should you run into any problems, be sure to let us know and we’ll be happy to help.

Kenneth Kimari

Kenn is a tech enthusiast by passion, Windows blogger by choice, and a massive coffee imbiber. He likes watching sci-fi movies in his free time and tearing gadgets apart so he can fix them.

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