Trending March 2024 # How To Use Excel Vba Round Function? # Suggested April 2024 # Top 5 Popular

You are reading the article How To Use Excel Vba Round Function? updated in March 2024 on the website Moimoishop.com. We hope that the information we have shared is helpful to you. If you find the content interesting and meaningful, please share it with your friends and continue to follow and support us for the latest updates. Suggested April 2024 How To Use Excel Vba Round Function?

Excel VBA Round Function

Valuation, Hadoop, Excel, Mobile Apps, Web Development & many more.

If the number you are trying to round have the last digit after decimal <= 0.4, it rounds it down (Round Down). Suppose the decimal part is exactly 0.5 then what does it do? In such cases, it checks with the integer part of the number. If the integer part is even then it rounds down to the even number of the decimal part. If integer part is odd, then it rounds it up to the even number. This method of rounding is also called as “Banker’s rounding”.

Syntax of Round Function in Excel VBA

VBA Round function has the following syntax:

Where,

Expression – The floating number you wanted to round.

Decimal_places – It’s an optional argument which takes an integer value which specifies the decimal places up-to which the number is supposed to be round. Should always be greater than or equals to zero. If not specified, by default zero is considered. Which means a number is rounded to an integer.

How to Use Excel VBA Round Function?

We will learn how to use a VBA Round function with few examples in Excel.

You can download this VBA Round Excel Template here – VBA Round Excel Template

Example #1 – VBA Round Function to Round a Number

Follow the below steps to use Round function in Excel VBA.

Step 1: Insert a new module under Visual Basic Editor (VBE).

Code:

Sub

Round_Ex1()

End Sub

Step 3: Use MsgBox function to be able to pop up a message like this “The Value Rounded is:”

Code:

Sub

Round_Ex1() MsgBox "The Value Rounded is: "

End Sub

Step 4: Now, add “& Round (10.9834, 2)” in front of MsgBox command, so that the rounded value will be shown up in the message box along.

Code:

Sub

Round_Ex1() MsgBox "The Value Rounded is: " & Round(10.9834, 2)

End Sub

Step 5: Hit F5 or the Run button placed at the uppermost panel to run this code. You will see an output as shown in the below.

Step 1: Define a new sub-procedure in VBE to store a macro.

Code:

Sub

Round_Ex2()

End Sub

Step 2: Define a variable named roundNumber as Double which can hold the value of the number to be rounded.

Code:

Sub

Round_Ex2()

Dim

roundNumber

As Double

End Sub

Step 3: Assign a number value which is to be rounded to this variable using assignment operator.

Code:

Sub

Round_Ex2()

Dim

roundNumber

As Double

roundNumber = 23.98

End Sub

Step 4: Use a combination of MsgBox along with Round function to round this number up-to one decimal point.

Code:

Sub

Round_Ex2()

Dim

roundNumber

As Double

roundNumber = 23.98 MsgBox "The number rounded is: " & Round(roundNumber, 1)

End Sub

Step 5: Let’s hit F5 or the Run button to run this code and see the output.

You can see an output as shown in the screenshot above. Please note that with the logic of “round to even”, the last decimal is rounded to 10 and the next decimal becomes 10 itself, due to which the number is rounded to the closest even part of the integer (i.e. 24).

Example #3 – Round Cell Value Using VBA Round

Suppose the value you wanted to round is stored in one cell of your excel worksheet.

All you want is to round this value up-to two decimal places.

Step 1: Define a new sub-procedure in a Module to store the macro.

Sub

Round_Ex3()

End Sub

Step 2: Write command as “Range (“A2”).Value =”. This command works as a location where the output will be stored.

Code:

Sub

Round_Ex3() Range("A2").Value =

End Sub

Step 3: Now, use a round function to round the value present in cell A1 and store the result in cell A2. Write the following piece of code: Round (Range (“A1”).Value, 2).

Code:

Sub

Round_Ex3() Range("A2").Value = Round(Range("A1").Value, 2)

End Sub

Step 4: Hit F5 or Run button to run this code and see the output in cell A2 of your worksheet.

Example #4 – Round a Number Using VBA RoundUp Function

Suppose, you want to round a number up using VBA. You can do that by using WorksheetFunction.RoundUp function.

Step 1: Define a new sub-procedure in Visual Basic Editor that can store your macro.

Code: 

Sub

Round_Ex4()

End Sub

Step 2: Define two variables, one to hold the number you wanted to round up. And the other to store the roundup result.

Code:

Sub

Round_Ex4()

  Dim

numToRound

As Double

  Dim

numRoundUp

As Double

End Sub

Step 3: Store a value into variable numToRound which you wanted to round up.

Code:

Sub

Round_Ex4()

Dim

numToRound

As Double

Dim

numRoundUp

As Double

numToRound = 12.7543712

End Sub

Step 4: Now, use RoundUp to roundup this number and store the result in a numRoundUp variable.

Code:

Sub

Round_Ex4()

  Dim

numToRound

As Double

  Dim

numRoundUp

As Double

numToRound = 12.7543712 numRoundUp = Application.WorksheetFunction.RoundUp(numToRound, 4)

End Sub

Step 5: Use MsgBox to show the output under the message box.

Code:

Sub

Round_Ex4()

Dim

numToRound

As Double

Dim

numRoundUp

As Double

numToRound = 12.7543712 numRoundUp = Application.WorksheetFunction.RoundUp(numToRound, 4) MsgBox "The number rounded up is: " & numRoundUp

End Sub

Step 6: Hit F5 or Run button to run this code and see the output.

Example #5 – Round down a Number Using VBA RoundDown Function

Step 1: In a new sub-procedure, define two new variables with the name numToRoundDown and roundDownNum. One to hold the value of the number to be rounded down and others to store the output after the number is rounded down.

Code:

Sub

Round_Ex5()

Dim

numToRoundDown

As Double

Dim

roundDownNum

As Double

End Sub

Step 2: Assign value you want to be rounded down to the variable named “numToRoundDown”.

Code:

Sub

Round_Ex5()

Dim

numToRoundDown

As Double

Dim

roundDownNum

As Double

numToRoundDown = 7.075711

End Sub

Step 3: Now, use RoundDown to roundup this number and store the result in a roundDownNum variable.

Code:

Sub

Round_Ex5()

Dim

numToRoundDown

As Double

Dim

roundDownNum

As Double

numToRoundDown = 7.075711 roundDownNum = Application.WorksheetFunction.RoundDown(numToRoundDown, 4)

End Sub

Step 4: Use MsgBox function to show up the value of a number rounded down.

Code:

Sub

Round_Ex5()

Dim

numToRoundDown

As Double

Dim

roundDownNum

As Double

numToRoundDown = 7.075711 roundDownNum = Application.WorksheetFunction.RoundDown(numToRoundDown, 4) MsgBox "The number rounded down is: " & roundDownNum

End Sub

Step 5: Hit F5 or Run button to run this code and see the output as a message box.

This is it in the article. We have captured the concepts of VBA Round, Round Up and Round Down with a handful of examples.

Things to Remember

This function uses a Banker’s rounding method to round the numbers which are somewhat different than the actual rounding method.

This function is used to round a number with a floating point or a number with fixed-decimals up-to specified number of places.

It means the function will round up or down the number depending upon the number after decimal points.

Argument decimal_places must be greater than or equal to zero.

If decimal_places is left blank, it will be considered as zero and the number will then be rounded to the nearest integer.

If decimal_places is set less than zero, then run time error 5 occurs. “Run-time error ‘5’: Invalid procedure call or argument”.

It is not really predictable to what this function will round the value when the digit after the decimal is 5.

If one or both the argument of Round function is non-numeric, then the function will return run time 13 error. “Run-time error ’13’: Type mismatch”.

Recommended Articles

This has been a guide to VBA Round Function. Here we have discussed how to use Excel VBA Round Function along with practical examples and downloadable excel template. You can also go through our other suggested articles –

You're reading How To Use Excel Vba Round Function?

How To Use Excel Countif Function (Examples + Video)

Simple calculation such as adding the values in a range of cells or counting the values in reach of cells is something that you would have to do when working with data in Excel.

And in some cases, you may have to count only those cells that meet a specific criterion.

And you can easily do that with the COUNTIF function in Excel

In this tutorial, I will show you how the Excel COUNTIF function works with simple examples add a detailed explanation

Let’s first look at the syntax of the COUNTIF function:

=COUNTIF(range, criteria)

where

range is the range of cells where you want to count cells that meet the condition

criteria is the condition that must be evaluated against the range of cells for a cell to be counted.

Now let’s have a look at some examples that will show you how to use the COUNTIF function in Excel.

With the COUNTIF function, you can count all the cells that contain a specific text string.

Suppose you have a dataset as shown below and you want to count all the cells that have the text Printer in it.

Here is the formula that will do this:

=COUNTIF(A2:A9,"Printer")

The above formula uses the text I specified as the second argument as the criteria and counts all the cells that have the same text (which is “Printer”)

In this example, I have manually entered the criteria text, but you can also refer to a cell that contains the criteria text.

Note: Criteria text in the COUNTIF formula is not case sensitive. So I can also use ‘printer’ or ‘PRINTER’, as the result would still be the same

Just like I used the COUNTIF function with text, I can also use it with cells containing numbers.

Suppose I have a dataset as shown below and I want to count all the cells where the number in column B is greater than 30.

Below is the formula that will do this:

The above formula uses the greater than an operator with the number as the criteria. This tells Excel to only consider those cells where the value is more than 30.

While there is the COUNTA function that counts the cells that contain numbers, there is no in-built formula that can count only those cells that contain a text string.

But it can easily be done using the COUNTIF function.

Suppose you have a dataset as shown below and you only want to count the number of cells that are text (and ignore the numbers).

Here is the formula that will do this:

=COUNTIF(A2:A10,"*")

The above formula uses an asterisk (which is a wildcard character). An asterisk represents the text of any length.

So this criteria would count all the cells where there is any text string (of any length). In case the cells are empty/blank or have numbers in them, then those would not be counted.

Criteria could be a number, expression, cell reference, text, or a formula.

Criteria which are text or mathematical/logical symbols (such as =,+,-,/,*) should be in double-quotes.

Wildcard characters can be used in criteria.

There are three wildcard characters in Excel – the question mark (?), an asterisk (*), and tilde (~)

A question mark (?) matches any single character

An asterisk matches (*) any sequence of characters.

If you want to find an actual question mark or asterisk, type a tilde (~) before the character.

Criteria are case-insensitive (“Hello” and “hello” are treated as the same).

Related Excel Functions:

How To Declare Variant Data Type In Excel Vba?

Excel VBA Variant Data Types

In VBA, we have different types of Variable data types. We use them when we need to specify some certain kind of input to be given. Suppose, for the whole number we use Integer, for the text we use String and for lengthy data set we use Long data type. And there are some more data types that we use different types of variable declaration. But what if I tell you that we can define all these variables in a single Data type. For that purpose, we have VBA Variant where we can define any type of variable which we want.

VBA Variant is as easy as using other data types. For defining any kind of variable use any name or alphabet to name it and then we choose data type which we want. Let’s see an example where we will see how a variable can be declared using Integer data type.

Watch our Demo Courses and Videos

Valuation, Hadoop, Excel, Mobile Apps, Web Development & many more.

As we can see in the above screenshot, for Integer data type variable, we can use number ranging from -32768 to +32767. But if we choose a variant here instead of Integer, then it will work same as Integer but there will not be any limit as data type Variant consists of all kind of variable formation in it.

How to Declare Variant Data Type in Excel VBA?

We will summarize the whole process of declaring variables in VBA by using VBA Variant. Let’s see an example where we will use traditional data types for declaring variables first.

You can download this VBA Variant Excel Template here – VBA Variant Excel Template

Steps to Declare Variant Data Type

Follow the below steps to declare Variant Data Type in Excel by using VBA code.

Step 1: Go to the VBA window, under the Insert menu tab select Module as shown below.

Step 2: Now write the subprocedure for VBA Variant in any name as you want. We have used the name which can define the process which uses.

Code:

Sub

VBA_Variant1()

End Sub

Step 3: Now define a variable where we can store or print any kind of text or name. For that, we need to use a string data type.

Code:

Sub

VBA_Variant1()

Dim

Name

As String

End Sub

Step 4: Now define another variable where we can store or print any data. For that, we will again use a String data type.

Code:

Sub

VBA_Variant1()

Dim

Name

As String

Dim

DoB

As String

End Sub

Step 5: Now define another variable where we can store some numbers. For that, we will use an integer data type.

Code:

Sub

VBA_Variant1()

Dim

Name

As String

Dim

DoB

As String

Dim

Age

As Integer

End Sub

Step 6: And at last, we will declare another variable where we will be storing lengthy number using datatype Long

Code:

Sub

VBA_Variant1()

Dim

Name

As String

Dim

DoB

As String

Dim

Age

As Integer

Dim

RollNo

As Long

End Sub

So basically here, we will be creating a database which will be having the name of a student, Date of Birth, Age, and Roll No. Now to complete this process, we will assign the values to each of the variables which we defined above.

Step 7: So we will declare the name of the student as Ashwani whose date of birth is 02 Sept 1990 and age is 29 and whose roll number is 16238627 in his certification exam as shown below.

Code:

Sub

VBA_Variant1()

Dim

Name

As String

Dim

DoB

As String

Dim

Age

As Integer

Dim

RollNo

As Long

Name = "Ashwani" DoB = "02-09-1990" Age = 29 RollNo = 16238627

End Sub

Debug print is the best way here, as we have multiple values for which if we use Msgbox then we need to use separated msgbox to see the output. So, to avoid that, we will use Debug.Print

Step 8: Use Debug.Print function and write all the variable which we defined above separated by Commas as shown below.

Code:

Sub

VBA_Variant1()

Dim

Name

As String

Dim

DoB

As String

Dim

Age

As Integer

Dim

RollNo

As Long

Name = "Ashwani" DoB = "02-09-1990" Age = 29 RollNo = 16238627

Debug.Print

Name, DoB, Age, RollNo

End Sub

Step 9: To see the output, open the Immediate Window from the View menu list. Or we can use a short cut key as Ctrl + G to get this window.

We will see, all the variable which we have declared above, we are able to see the values stored in each of the variables.

Step 11: Now we will replace each variables String, Integer and Long with Variant data type as shown below.

Code:

Sub

VBA_Variant1()

Dim

Name

As Variant

Dim

DoB

As Variant

Dim

Age

As Variant

Dim

RollNo

As Variant

Name = "Ashwani" DoB = "02-09-1990" Age = 29 RollNo = 16238627

Debug.Print

Name, DoB, Age, RollNo

End Sub

Step 12: Again run the code. We will the same output as we got using different variable data type with the Variant data type.

And if we compare the output, then both outputs are the same.

Pros & Cons of Excel VBA Variant

We can replace most of the data types with a single data type Variant.

VBA Variant is easy as using Integer or Long or String data types for declaring variables.

This saves time in thinking which type of data type we need to choose for variable declaration.

For each different data, we will get the same output by using a Variant data type as we could get using traditional variables.

We cannot use some certain types of variable data type such Double if we want to replace this with Variant.

Things to Remember

Use double quote (Inverted commas) if you want to declare text using Variant or any other data types.

We can choose any name to declare variable using Variant, as we used to perform with other types of data types.

VBA Variant has the limitation where cannot use IntelliSense list, which has inbuilt functions.

VBA always suggests the best possible data types we could declare of any type of data.

Recommended Articles

This is a guide to VBA Variant. Here we discuss how to declare Variant Data Type in Excel using VBA code along with practical examples and downloadable excel template. You can also go through our other suggested articles –

How To Use Ai In Excel For Free

AI just killed Excel. As someone who’s spent thousands of hours using Excel, this is nothing short of amazing. Gone are the days of grappling with complex formulas and sitting through lengthy tutorials. Introducing Rows, the only AI Excel tool you will ever need. And the best part? It’s completely free!

You can access Rows for free at chúng tôi In this comprehensive guide, we will walk you through the process of using AI in Excel for free, highlighting its key features, and demonstrating how it can revolutionize your data analysis and visualization tasks.

Must Check: Best AI Video Generators: Create Engaging Videos Automatically

Rows allows you to import data from various sources seamlessly. Whether you want to upload files, fetch data from your Facebook ad campaign, Zapier, or Twitter, Rows has got you covered. With the ‘Actions’ feature, you can effortlessly bring in data from different platforms and get started with your analysis.

Once you’ve imported your data, it’s time to let the power of AI take over. Rows provides an intuitive interface where you can simply ask AI to perform various tasks and analyses. Here are a few examples of what you can do:

Do a trend analysis: AI can analyze your data and identify trends and patterns, helping you make data-driven decisions.

Create a graph: Simply ask AI to create a graph based on your data, saving you the time and effort of manual chart creation.

Request insights: Ask AI questions like “How many purchases per campaign?” and receive meaningful insights and answers.

Once you’re done with your analysis, sharing your work is a breeze with Rows. You have multiple options to choose from:

Embed in your notion, workspace, or any site: Easily embed your Sheets, graphs, or visualizations in your preferred platform.

Share as a public page: Showcase your work by sharing it as a public page, allowing others to view and interact with your data.

Share as a collaboration link: Collaborate with your team by sharing a link that allows them to access and work on the same Sheets simultaneously.

Even if you don’t have any data to import, Rows has you covered. The real-time data collection feature enables you to fetch data directly from the internet. Simply ask Rows for the information you need, and it will fetch it in real-time, ensuring your analysis is up to date.

Also Check: How to Create Animated Talking AI Free: It Takes Only 2 Minutes

Rows understands that data can quickly become outdated. To address this, the ‘Schedule refresh’ function automatically updates your data periodically from the source. Say goodbye to manually updating your datasets and let Rows handle it for you.

Rows not only offers powerful AI capabilities but also provides a community-driven platform where users can create and share their own actions. The Community Feature allows you to explore and utilize actions created by other users, expanding the functionality of Rows even further. This collaborative environment fosters innovation and enables users to benefit from the collective knowledge and expertise of the community.

Yes, Rows is completely free to use. You can access all its features and functionalities without any cost.

Absolutely! Rows supports importing Excel files, CSV files, and data from various other sources. You can easily bring your existing data into Rows and leverage its AI capabilities.

Not at all! Rows is designed to be user-friendly and accessible to users without programming skills. Its intuitive interface and AI-powered features make it easy for anyone to analyze and visualize data without extensive technical knowledge.

Yes, collaboration is a key feature of Rows. You can share your Sheets with others by providing them with collaboration links. Multiple users can work on the same Sheets simultaneously, making it convenient for teamwork and project collaboration.

Rows takes data security seriously. Your data is encrypted and stored securely, and Rows adheres to industry-standard security protocols to protect your information.

Yes, Rows provides export functionality, allowing you to export your data in various formats, including Excel, CSV, and PDF. This enables you to use your data in other tools and share it with stakeholders who might prefer different file formats.

AI has revolutionized the way we analyze and work with data, and Rows brings the power of AI to Excel users for free. With its intuitive interface, seamless data importation, AI-driven analysis, and collaboration features, Rows offers a comprehensive solution for data analysis and visualization. Whether you’re a business professional, a student, or a data enthusiast, Rows can help you unlock the full potential of your data and make informed decisions. Try it out today at chúng tôi and experience the future of data analysis in Excel.

Share this:

Twitter

Facebook

Like this:

Like

Loading…

Related

How To Maximize The Use Of Intersect Function – Advanced Dax

But to understand how it works, you need to get much better at understanding virtual tables. Virtual tables are a key concept when utilizing DAX measures within Power BI.

What the INTERSECT function specifically does is that it allows you to – within a measure – compare one virtual table to another one. You will then finally be able to return a table of results that appear in both versions of these two virtual tables.

In the example that I run through, I’ll showcase a really unique insight that you can discover using the INTERSECT function. This particular insight can be re-used in many different ways. This is most useful when you’re working with customer data and your aim is to understand your customers better.

The best way to learn this function is through a practical scene. So, I’m going to work through a scenario and work this out based on our customers for the current month. These customers should also have a purchase history for the past two months. And we’re going to figure out which of our current customers had previous order transactions from 2 months ago.

Take a look at this Power BI report that I’ve created to demonstrate the INTERSECT function. First, I’ve set up some filters on the left-hand side where we can select any month.

Then, I have the columns for all the customers. The Total Sales and Sales LM columns show the customers who have purchased histories for the current month as well as for the last month. The formula for Total Sales is very simple. It’s just the sum of all the sales from a certain customer.

The Sales LM formula is a simple total sales formula branching out into a time intelligence calculation using DATEADD to jump back to the previous month.

It’s important to understand the initial context of the formula since we’re enabling a calculation of last month using the mentioned formulas. Thus, we need to get the initial context right so that we can apply the DAX formulas.

How do we dynamically work out the customers who purchased two months in a row? That’s what you can see in the Customers 2M in A Row column.

Now, I also want to know the total sales from these customers so I’ve added the Sales from Customers 2M in A Row column.

Let’s take a look at how useful INTERSECT is when it comes to finding out the repeat customers. Here’s the formula for Customers 2M In A Row.

In this formula, I placed two virtual tables, which are out variables (VAR) inside the INTERSECT function. Basically, it evaluates the list of items or rows that are present in the first table, but not in the second one.

The initial table here is CustomerTM which stands for those customers who have purchased this month. Then, the formula proceeds to check whether or not these customers are also listed in the CustomerLM table.

If a customer exists in both of the virtual tables, they will be retained. Thus, this formula allows us to end up with all the customers who purchased this month and the month before.

Next, I used the COUNTROWS function to count those remaining customers.

Now, let’s talk about creating virtual tables for those customers who have purchased for 2 months in a row.

If you have noticed, I put them inside the VAR (variables) function. I highly recommend these functions as they are a fantastic addition to writing more complex formulas. 

In this particular set for VAR CustomerTM, I’m creating a virtual table of customer IDs. Then, for VAR CustomerLM, I’m creating a virtual table again for our customers last month. But this time, I’ve added the CALCULATETABLE function, so that it can jump back to the customer set of the previous month instead of the current context.

Here’s what’s interesting about this calculation that we have now.

The formula only checks every single row of the customers because the customers are filtered. If there is no sales for the previous month for a specific row (customer), there is nothing to evaluate. Thus, the Customers 2M In A Row column is blank. But if a customer has a previous record, it then counts as 1.

For instance, if we look at the data for Adam Thompson, it returns 1 under the Customers 2M In A Row column. This means that this customer has a record for both last month and the two months before that.

You might not realize the importance of using INTERSECT right away, but there’s a really good reason why you need to use this formula. It’s mainly because you can reuse this calculation across a wide variety of contexts. Take a look at this example below.

To come up with the sample data above, I just used the same formula. But this time, I’m starting in a different initial context. Instead of evaluating one single row, it evaluates many contexts like the State Code. And then, it creates a list of customers who purchased in June 2024 as well as in May 2024. Then, I’ll compare it to those customers who purchased once in a particular state in the current month.

You can see in the Customers 2M In A Row column the exact count of customers matching up to that criteria.

Below that table is another visualization that showcases the same data for Customers 2M In A Row by State Code.

You can actually change the context in your model again depending on your requirements. If your filter is working correctly, you can reapply this formula to add to other situations.

This is why I said that INTERSECT is very powerful. Instead of just writing IF statements, you can utilize these INTERSECT functions to your formula.

Moreover, we work on the total number of sales from our repeat customers.

The results in the Sales from Customers 2M In A Row column is the sum of the customer’s purchase for the current month and the previous one. Take note that we can only get this result if the customer has purchased for two months in a row. 

This is the formula for the total sales of the repeat customers.

You can see here that the pattern is almost exactly the same. The only difference here is that instead of COUNTROWS, I used the CALCULATE function to change the context of the calculation. 

This is because what we need here is the total amount of sales from the customers. But as you can see, I’m still using the INTERSECT function. It’s very helpful when it comes to Pareto Analysis. But you can also apply this function in a number of different ways.

You can still take things further than before. You can actually calculate the customers who purchased for three months in a row using the formula below.

All I have added is a different calculation that jumps back two months, instead of one.

After that, I’ve added an INTERSECT function inside another INTERSECT function. So, it will not only evaluate the customers for the current month and it’s purchase history last month. It will also check if the particular customer has also purchased 2 months ago.

To add this data into your table, simply drag the Customers 3M In A Row formula into the table.

You’ll see in the bottom that there’s a total of 45 customers who purchased for three months in a row. This is quite an intensive insight that is very useful.

As mentioned earlier, INTERSECT is a table function and it can be used in many different ways.

The focus with this tutorial is for you to see how you can utilize it in a measure and in various ways within a measure. That’s how I think this can be used in a very efficient way to run some exceptionally compelling analysis.

Sam

How To Create Excel Template?

Create Templates in Excel

We have different types and categories of templates available in Excel, which can access from the File menu ribbon’s New section. This has different types of Templates such as Business, Calendar, Budget, Planner, Financial Management, etc. To create customized templates other than these, we can use Data Validation for drop-down, Table, and Images and give them proper header names. We can also insert a logo for our template. To standardize the template, always fix the theme or template, and visuals should see the purpose of creation. In this article, we will learn about Create Templates in Excel.

Start Your Free Excel Course

Excel functions, formula, charts, formatting creating excel dashboard & others

How to create Templates?

Templates can be made by saving an Excel file with a specialized extension and then saving the file in a specified directory.

What type of content can be stored as a Template?

Text data can be stored as a template. Various document sections, such as page titles, column and row labels, text, section headings, and any cell in Excel containing text or numbers, or any kind of data, can all be included in a template. We can also include any graphical shapes, logos of companies, or any background image and even Excel formulae.

The type of text formatting, such as font, color, or size, can be saved along with the data as a template. Formats of cells or worksheets, such as column width or background fill color or alignment of text and even formats of numbers and dates, and several sheets can be saved in templates.

All hidden and protected areas, such as locked cells that cannot be altered and hidden columns and rows, or even worksheets that may contain data not meant for general view.

All Macros are specially customized toolbars that may contain frequently used options; macros and the quick access toolbar can be saved as templates.

How to Create Templates in Excel?

To create a template in recent versions of Excel, very little work must be done.

Excel 2013 & later versions – Before saving a file as a template, one has to define the custom template directory.

Go to File.

Select the option Save in the menu ribbon.

Find the option Default personal templates location among the various options.

Choose a directory where you want to save all the templates. DocumentsCustom Office Templates is regarded as a good choice.

Firstly, go to the File.

Now, the option to provide a name to your template file appears.

Here we see that in the drop-down menu, there is an option called Excel Template (*.xltx)

Note: It is better to choose “Excel Macro-Enabled Template” (.xltm) for cases where the workbook might contain macros. “Excel 97-2003 Template” (.xlt) is to be chosen for the cases where the version of the Excel workbook is very old. “Excel Template” (.xltx) should be chosen for all other cases.

Examples to Create Templates in Excel

Below are some examples to create templates in Excel.

Example #1

First, we will make all the changes in a new file and modify it until all the items you wish to save in the template are ready. Then you have to save the file as a template. Template files have a special extension.

In the screenshot above, we have added an image and text as the template’s structure. Now we shall follow the steps below to create the Excel template.

Step 1 – Firstly, go to File.

Now, the option to provide a name to your template file appears.

Step 3 – Here, we see that in the drop-down menu, select Excel Template (*.xltx)

Now, automatically, Excel will place this template file in the appropriate directory. And new Excel documents can be created based on this template file by navigating and choosing “Personal” in the new file window (right next to Featured) and then choosing the appropriate template.

Concepts always become much clearer when we have more examples. So, let us look at yet another example of creating Excel Templates.

Example #2

Let us explore how to save a Macro-Enabled Excel template through an example. Suppose we have an Excel with some macros(s) to be used as a base for other files; then we need to save this Excel as a macro-enabled Excel template.

In the screenshots above, we added a macro in the template file, and now we shall create the template in Excel.

Now, the option to provide a name to your template file appears.

Here we see that in the drop-down menu, there is an option called Excel Macro-Enabled Template (*.xltm)

Now, automatically, Excel will place this template file in the appropriate directory. And new Excel documents can be created based on this template file by navigating.

Firstly, go to File.

Choose Personal in the new file window (next to Featured) and then choose Template 2.

Example #3

Now, let us look at another example. Firstly, we will make all the changes in the new file and modify it until all the items you wish to save in the template are ready. Then you have to save the file as a template. Template files have a special extension.

We have added an image and text as the template’s structure in the above screenshot. Now we shall follow the steps below to create the Excel template.

Now, the option to provide a name to your template file appears.

Step 2 – Here, we see that in the drop-down menu, select Excel Template (*.xltx)

Example #4

Now, let us look at yet another example. Now, we will make all the changes in a new file and modify it until all the items you wish to save in the template are ready. Then you have to save the file as a template. Template files have a special extension.

In the screenshot above, as you can see, we have added the template structure – we have added a world map, increased the default worksheets, and renamed them, and now we shall proceed to save this file as a template.

Now we shall follow the steps below to create the Excel template.

Now, the option to provide a name to your template file appears.

Step 2 – Here, from the drop-down menu, select Excel 97-2003 Template (*.xlt)

Example #5

Now we shall use a template file to create a new file in Excel. We will make use of the Example #4 template file.

Firstly, go to File.

Choose “Personal” in the new file window (next to Featured) and choose the appropriate template.

We shall choose Template 4 as the base and create a new file in Excel.

As we can see, all the template structures are retained, and the new file is named Template4 1 – the first file based on Template 4.

Example #6

Now we shall use another template file to create a new file in Excel. We will make use of the Example #3 template file.

We shall choose Template 3 as the base and create a new file in Excel.

Hence, we can see that the image and the header structure are retained in the new file. And it is also important to note that this new file is named Template 3 1 – signifying that it is the first file based on Template 3.

Example #7

Now we shall create another new template. We will create the template structure in Excel, as shown below.

Now we shall follow the steps below to create the Excel template.

Now, the option to provide a name to your template file appears.

Step 2 – Here, from the drop-down menu, select Excel Template (*.xltx)

This will create a Template 7 template with the template structure defined in the Default Template location in Excel.

Example #8

Now we shall attempt to use Template 7 to create another file in Excel.

Now, automatically, Excel will place this file in the appropriate directory.

Example #9

Let us see an example where we have Excel formulae in the Template file.

As we can see above, we have created a Template structure with the formula for Net Profit Margin defined as:

Net Profit Margin = (Net Profit/Total Revenue)*100

Since this is the template, no data is present here. Let us see how to create the template file in Excel.

Now we shall follow the steps below to create the Excel template.

Now, the option to provide a name to your template file appears.

Step 2 – Here, from the drop-down menu, select Excel Template (*.xltx)

This will create a Template 9. xltx template with the template structure defined in the Default Template location.

Example #10

Now, we shall attempt to use the previous example template to create a new file and see if that works in Excel.

We see that in the new file, we have the structure defined, and once we feed in the data on Columns A, B, and C, the Net Profit Margin in Column D is automatically calculated using the Template File formula.

Example #11

Let us now use our second example – Template 2 to create a new file in Excel. Template2 has a defined macro, so let us see if the same is available in the new file.

Now let us see what happens when we select “Template2”.

It opens up a new file with the same macro (that was defined in the template file) loaded automatically.

We will get the desired result.

Things to Remember

For versions of Excel 2013 and later, it is possible to change Excel’s default template for a workbook by saving the template at the appropriate location. All default templates must have a specific name – chúng tôi or chúng tôi and must be saved in Excel’s startup directory. C:Users%username%AppDataRoamingMicrosoftExcelXLSTART

The template has to be named xltx or Sheet to modify the template to add new sheets in existing files. xltm and must be saved in the same folder.

Recommended Articles

This is a guide to Create Templates in Excel. Here we discuss how to Create Templates in Excel, practical examples, and the type of content that can be stored as a Template. You can also go through our other suggested articles –

Update the detailed information about How To Use Excel Vba Round Function? on the Moimoishop.com website. We hope the article's content will meet your needs, and we will regularly update the information to provide you with the fastest and most accurate information. Have a great day!