Trending February 2024 # How To Useto Generate Images # Suggested March 2024 # Top 8 Popular

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OpenDream.ai is a powerful AI art generator tool that helps users easily create custom images. This platform was developed to make graphic design accessible to everyone, regardless of their experience level. Co-Founders of Opendream believe that everyone has the ability to express themselves creatively, and OpenDream is here to help you do just that.

Step by Step to Use OpenDream: Log in / Sign up

You can create an image by entering the prompt and negative prompt in the prompt/negative prompt box at the top. You can also use the Random button to use our random prompt templates.

Step by Step to Use OpenDream: Enter the Prompts

 Do not forget to customize the parameters so that the output image is the way you want it.

The guidance Scale parameter determines the degree to which the model obeys the user prompt, with a range of values from 1 to 50:

1: Mostly ignore the user prompt.

3: Be more creative.

7: Good balance between compliance with user prompts and creative freedom.

15: Comply with the prompt rather than freely.

30 – 50: Complete prompt compliance.

The recommend of the Guidance Scale: 15

This parameter indicates the number of images you want to create with each input prompt. You can create up to 10 images at a time.

The denoising process requires a specific number of sampling steps. While increasing the number of steps can improve the quality of the output, it also prolongs the process.

Recommend: 25 sampling steps.

OpenDream provides you with 5 frame options suitable for each image creation purpose.

The seed is a random parameter that determines the initial noise pattern used to generate an AI image and ultimately affects the final output.

It’s time to get started! While you’ll eventually learn the best strategies for prompts, let’s focus on the basics for now.

The order of words in the prompt matters: Words at the beginning carry more weight than those at the end.

The limit to the number of words you can add to a prompt: Somewhere around 75 words

Get your creative juices flowing with this awesome prompt structure:

Change the lighting: sunrise, sunset, rainy, cinematic…

Add details: intricate details, highly details, realistic

Try different mediums: oil painting, digital art, pixel art…

Experiment with camera angles: low, eye level, high, and aerial…

Add an engine (as in: a 3D rendering engine, if you want it to look more like a videogame): Unreal Engine, Octane render

Emulate an artist’s style like Van Gogh or Studio Ghibli

Let’s get creative and start making your images!

Create, explore, and share AI art using DALL E, Stable Diffusion, and Midjourney

To generate AI art using a template of style, model, and parameters, follow these steps:

Visit the OpenDream website and sign in to your account.

Look for the option to create AI art or a similar feature on the platform. It may be labeled as “Generate Art,” “Create Artwork,” or something similar.

Select a template or style that appeals to you. Templates often include different artistic styles, themes, or predefined settings.

Choose the model or AI algorithm that will be used to generate the art. Depending on the platform, you may have options such as “Dreamlike Photoreal 2.0”, “Dreamlike Anime 1.0,” or specific model names.

Customize the parameters to fine-tune the output according to your preferences. Parameters can include factors like color intensity, brushstroke size, texture, or other artistic elements. Adjust these settings to achieve the desired aesthetic.

If available, preview the generated art before finalizing. Some platforms allow you to see a preview of the output before generating the final artwork. This can help you make additional adjustments if needed.

Depending on the complexity of the artwork and the platform’s processing speed, it may take a few seconds or minutes to generate the art. Be patient and allow the AI algorithms to work their magic.

Once the AI art is generated, it will be displayed on the screen. You can then save the artwork to your device or share it with others, depending on the options provided by the platform.

Remember, each AI art platform may have its own specific interface and terminology, so these steps serve as a general guideline. Explore the platform’s documentation or user interface to find the exact options and features for generating AI art with templates, styles, models, and parameters.

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Sms Marketing Ideas To Generate More Sales

SMS is a powerful marketing tool to touch base with your customers. Get to know why with these mind-boggling statistics:

85% of customers prefer to receive an SMS over a phone call or email while 80%+ customers respond to such business SMSs.

Half of your customer base would prefer to receive support communication through text messages while 47% of customers would give companies that don’t include SMS as a communication channel, a pass.

Now that we have established how important SMS Marketing is to businesses, let us find out what you could do to generate more sales through this affordable yet effective marketing communication tool.

Seek permission

Also read: 2023’s Top 10 Business Process Management Software

Make them feel special

Establish a feel-good factor in your customers. Celebrate their special days with them. Do not forget to send in your wishes on holidays either. This helps you create an experience in the minds of your target audience. It’s all about personalised communication and experience marketing.

Provide reminders and confirmations

Imagine missing out on your Insurance Premium Payment because the date slipped out of your mind. Or not receiving a service order confirmation from your Pest Control Service Provider. These messages would certainly make life easy for the consumers and you as a business owner would be doing a service worth remembering for them.

Upsell

Also read: 9 Best Cybersecurity Companies in the World

Add exclusivity

Start a loyalty program for your long-standing customers. Offer product previews exclusively to customers who respond to your SMS campaign with a special code, or discounts to customers who show the text message at the time of billing.

Product update

A new customer in your departmental store, couldn’t find the items he intended to purchase. Once the products are available, you ensure to connect with the customer with an update and convert him into a regular.

Educate and inform

Provide free professional tips occasionally so your customers know that you do not just attempt to push sales. Your gardening supply customers will be delighted to get information on essential garden care from time to time. If they find the info to be of great value, then it is likely that the message will be shared among contacts, earning you a few more customers.

You can also use the platform to share exciting company news like launching a new product or opening a new store with your customers. This information will help you reinforce your brand image.

Welcome feedback

Also read: 10 Types of Developer Jobs: IT Jobs

Engage with competitions and polls

Run engaging competitions and fun polls for your customers to engage with your business. Better engagement will always lead to increased sales.

Inspired by these ideas to give SMS marketing a try? Get in touch with GuniSMS today to kick-start the personalised SMS Marketing Campaign for your business and watch your sales figures soar.

How To Blend Two Images In Photoshop

Learn how to blend two images together in Photoshop using layer opacity, layer blend modes and layer masks. Watch the video or follow along with the written tutorial below it!

Written by Steve Patterson.

In this tutorial, I’ll show you three easy ways to blend two images together in Photoshop! We’ll start with the most basic way to blend images, and that’s by using the Opacity option in the Layers panel. Then we’ll look at how to get more interesting and creative results using Photoshop’s layer blend modes. And finally, we’ll learn how to blend two images seamlessly together using a layer mask. I’ll also include a quick tip in each of the three sections to help speed up your workflow and get the best results.

Let’s get started!

How to blend images In Photoshop

I used Photoshop CC here but everything from CS6 to Photoshop 2023 or newer will work. You can get the latest version of Photoshop here.

You can also download this tutorial as a PDF and get my Complete Guide to Layer Blend Modes PDF as bonus!

Method 1: The Layer Opacity Option

The first way we’ll look at for blending two images together is by using Photoshop’s layer opacity option. Here’s the first image I’ll be using:

The first image. Photo credit: Adobe Stock.

And here’s the second image:

The second image. Photo credit: Adobe Stock.

If we look in the Layers panel, we see both images on their own separate layers. The beach photo is on the Background layer, and the portrait is on “Layer 1” above it:

The Layers panel showing each image on a separate layer.

Related: How to move images into the same Photoshop document

The Opacity Value

The Opacity option is found in the upper right of the Layers panel. By default, it’s set to 100%, which means that the currently-selected layer (“Layer 1”) is completely blocking the layer below it from view:

The Opacity option, set to 100% by default.

The Opacity value controls a layer’s level of transparency. By simply lowering the value, we make the layer more transparent, allowing some of the image below it to show through. The more we lower the opacity, the more the top image will fade into the bottom image. I’ll lower the opacity from 100% down to 75%:

Lowering the opacity of the top layer to 75%.

This means that we’re now blending 75% of the image on the top layer with 25% of the image on the bottom layer. And here we see that the woman is starting to blend in with the beach photo:

The result with the top layer’s opacity lowered to 75%.

If I wanted to fade her even more into the background, I could simply lower the opacity value even further. I’ll lower it to 30%:

Setting the Opacity value to 30 percent.

At 30% opacity, we’re seeing just 30% of the top image and 70% of the bottom image, creating a nice blending effect. You’ll want to adjust the opacity value as needed for your images:

The result with the top layer’s opacity at 30%.

Quick Tip: Setting the Opacity value from the keyboard

Here’s a quick tip to speed up your workflow. You can change a layer’s opacity value directly from the keyboard. Press 1 for 10%, 2 for 20%, 3 for 30%, and so on. Press two numbers quickly, one right after the other, for more specific values (like 2 and then 5 for 25%). You can also press 0 for 100% opacity, or quickly press 0 twice for 0%.

Method 2: Layer Blend Modes

The second way we’ll look at for blending two images together is by using Photoshop’s layer blend modes. Blend modes are great for blending any two images together, but they’re especially useful for blending a texture with a photo. Here’s a portrait image that I have open:

The first image. Photo credit: Adobe Stock.

I’ll blend the portrait with this texture image:

The second image. Photo credit: Adobe Stock.

Again if we look in the Layers panel, we see each image on a separate layer. The portrait is on the Background layer and the texture is on the layer above it:

The Layers panel again showing each image on a separate layer.

The Blend Mode Option

Blend modes in Photoshop are different ways that layers can interact with each other. The Blend Mode option is found in the upper left of the Layers panel, directly across from the Opacity option. By default, a layer’s blend mode is set to Normal. “Normal” just means that the layer is not blending at all with the layers below it:

The Blend Mode option.

The result with the blend mode set to Multiply (left), Screen (center) and Overlay (right).

The results you get from the various blend modes will depend entirely on your images. In my case, I get the best result using the Soft Light blend mode:

Changing the blend mode to Soft Light.

Like the Overlay blend mode, Soft Light blends the two images together in a way that boosts the overall contrast. The difference is that Soft Light produces a more subtle and natural looking effect:

The result with the blend mode of the texture layer set to Soft Light.

Another blend mode that works really well with these two images is Divide:

Changing the blend mode to Divide.

Divide is one of the lesser-known and rarely-used blend modes in Photoshop. But with these two images, the effect actually looks pretty cool:

The blending effect with the texture layer set to Divide.

Combining blend modes with layer opacity

Once you’ve chosen a blend mode, you can fine-tune the result by adjusting the layer’s opacity, just as we saw earlier. I’ll leave the blend mode of the texture layer set to Divide and I’ll lower the opacity from 100% down to 50%:

Leaving the blend mode set to Divide and lowering the opacity to 50%.

And here’s the result:

Combining the blend mode with a lower opacity produces a less intense effect.

Download this tutorial as a print-ready PDF!

Quick Tip: How to cycle through blend modes from the keyboard

Here’s another quick tip to help speed up your workflow and make working with blend modes easier. You can cycle through Photoshop’s various blend modes directly from your keyboard. Press the letter V to quickly select the Move Tool. Then, press and hold your Shift key and use the plus ( + ) and minus ( – ) keys to move up or down through the list. This lets you quickly try out the different blend modes to find the one that works best.

Method 3: Using A Layer Mask

The third way we’ll look at for blending two images in Photoshop, and by far the most popular way, is by using a layer mask. Unlike the layer opacity option or the blend modes which blend entire images as a whole, layer masks let us control exactly where the two images blend together. There’s lots that we can do with layer masks, more than we could cover in a single tutorial. So here, we’ll just learn the basics.

Here’s the first image I’ll be using:

The first image. Photo credit: Adobe Stock.

And here’s the second image:

The second image. Photo credit: Adobe Stock.

Again looking in the Layers panel, we see each photo on a separate layer. The dandelion photo is on the Background layer and the girl is on “Layer 1” above it:

Each photo is on a separate layer.

Adding a layer mask

A layer mask thumbnail appears next to the layer’s preview thumbnail:

The new layer mask thumbnail.

How a layer mask works

Layer masks control the transparency of a layer, just like we saw with the Opacity option in the Layers panel. But while the Opacity option affects the transparency of the entire layer as a whole, a layer mask lets us add different levels of transparency to different parts of the layer. In other words, we can use a layer mask to show some areas while hiding others, making layer masks perfect for blending images.

They work by using black and white. Any part of the layer where the layer mask is filled with white remains visible. And any part of the layer where the mask is filled with black is hidden. Let’s see how we can quickly blend our two images together by drawing a black-to-white gradient on the layer mask.

Selecting the Gradient Tool

Select the Gradient Tool from the Toolbar:

Selecting the Gradient Tool.

Choosing the Black, White gradient

Choosing the Black, White gradient.

Blending the two images together

Drawing a black-to-white gradient on the layer mask from right to left.

When you release your mouse button, Photoshop draws the gradient on the layer mask and blends the two photos together. Here, we’re seeing the girl from the top image blending into the dandelions from the bottom image. If you’re not happy with the first result, simply draw another gradient on the mask to try again:

The two photos are now blending together.

Viewing the layer mask

If we look at the layer mask thumbnail in the Layers panel, we see where the gradient was drawn. The black area on the right is where the top image is hidden in the document, allowing the photo on the Background layer to show through. And the white area on the left is where the top image remains visible:

The layer mask thumbnail showing the gradient.

The dark to light gradient in the middle is what allows the two images to blend seamlessly together..

Quick Tip: How to toggle a layer mask on and off

And there we have it! That’s a quick look at how to blend two images together using the layer opacity option, layer blend modes, and a layer mask, in Photoshop!

To learn more about blending images with layer masks, see our Layer Masks and Gradients tutorial. Use our Layers Learning Guide to learn more about Photoshop layers, or visit our Photoshop Basics section for more tutorials!

How To Stylize Images Using Stable Diffusion Ai

Image stylization is a process of transforming the style of an image to a new one. For example, you may want to create a pencil drawing from a photo you have taken.

There has been a long line of research in style transfer, starting with hand-crafted algorithms to the state-of-the-art neural-network based methods.

In this article, I will explore image stylization using Stable Diffusion, a text-to-image model trained with millions of image-text pairs.

While existing methods have already created impressive results, the benefit of using text-to-image model is that all styles are already embedded in the model. No training is required. You will only need to specify the style you want with the text prompt. Lastly, if you are not happy with the result of the embedded model, you can further fine-tune and create your own model.

GUI

I will show you how to do it with AUTOMATIC1111 GUI. See my quick start guide for setting up in Google’s cloud server.

Workflow for stylizing images

Basic idea

The basic idea is to use img2img to modify an image with the new style specified in the text prompt.

Instead of using a random latent state, the original image was used to encode the initial latent state. With a small amount of randomness added, which is controlled by the denoising strength, the model constructs a new image according to the text prompt.

So if you include pencil drawing in your text prompt, the synthesized image will include visual elements of pencil drawing but the content of the image still follows the original one.

Step-by-step workflow

OK, enough of these theoretical stuffs! Here’s how you would actually do it.

I will use the following starting image generated using the Victorian girl prompt:

The original image to be stylized.

In AUTOMATIC1111 GUI, go to img2img tab and select the img2img sub tab. Upload the image to the img2img canvas.

Next you will need to give a prompt. The prompt should describes both the new style and the content of the original image. It does not need to be super detailed. Below is what I will use.

Insert the art style to the blank. (E.g. a charcoal sketch of a beautiful woman)

For stylizing images, you will be most tweaking two parameters: CFG scale and denoising strength.

If you want to be systematic, you can use the X/Y plot script to explore the interplay between CFG scale and Denoising strength. The image is specified by the seed value.

X/Y plot script settings.

Using the prompt:

A pencil sketch of a beautiful woman

Below is what you will get.

X/Y Plot of CFG scale vs denoising strength

When denoising strength is high, the image changes too much and loses it original content. When it is low, not much is changed.

The higher the CFG scale, the stronger the style is.

Euler sampling method with 50 steps works for most situations.

As a rule of thumb, set CFG scale to a high value between 20-30, and change denoising strength between 0.2 and 0.6 to achieve a good stylization while preserving the content.

Examples of stylized images

All stylized images in this section is generated from the original image below with zero examples. Only text prompts are provided.

Original

Here are some stylized images. The prompt is

The blank is filled in with the caption.

Charcoal

Impressionist

Pop art

Art Deco

Photograph

Art Nouveau

Cubism

John Sargent

Greg Rutkowski

3D character

Stone Sculpture

Van Gogh

Comic Strip

Modern fashion

It is also possible to switch the model to a different ethnicity.

Japanese

African

Hispanic

Alternative method

Adventurous readers can experiment with the so-called alternative img2img test which can preserve the content of original image far better than the method above.

The idea is to use the original image to create the latent noise pattern so that that it contains information of the original content.

To use the alternative noise, select img2img alternative test in the script dropdown menu.

New users should go through the example in the feature demo. Contrary to the demo, I found it useful to increase CFG scale so that the prompt is followed. Sometimes the weight of the style keyword needs to be increased.

Below is an example of pop art style generated with alternative img2img.

Pop art style using alternative img2img.

Whether it is better would be a matter of taste but it definitely follows the original content closely.

Treat it as an tool in your toolbox.

Summary

I have showed you how easy it is to use Stable Diffusion to stylize images. All you need to do is to use img2img method, supply a prompt, dial up the CFG scale, and tweak the denoising strength.

I hope this will inspire you to create some new artworks!

How To Place Multiple Images In Text With Photoshop

How to Place Multiple Images in Text with Photoshop

Learn how to place multiple images in text with Photoshop by splitting a word into its individual letters and filling each letter with a different image! A step-by-step tutorial.

Download the PDF: How to Place Multiple Images In Text

Written by Steve Patterson.

In a previous tutorial, I showed you the basics of how to place an image in text with Photoshop. And in that lesson, we placed a single image into an entire word. But what if you want to place a different image in each letter? That’s exactly what we’ll learn how to do here.

We’ll start by creating a document and adding some text. Then I’ll show you how to divide the text into separate letters and place a different image in each letter. Once the main effect is done, we’ll learn how to change the background color behind the text, or make the background transparent, and how to quickly add layer effects, like a stroke or a drop shadow, to every letter at once! And at the end, I’ll show you how to make sure that your text is perfectly centered in the document.

Here’s an example of what the final images in text effect will look like when we’re done:

The final result.

Let’s get started!

Download this tutorial as a print-ready PDF!

Which version of Photoshop do I need?

To follow along, you’ll want to be using Photoshop 2023 or later. You can get the latest Photoshop version here.

How to place images in text with Photoshop

In this first part of the tutorial, we’ll create the main effect by filling each letter in the word with a different image. Then once the main effect is done, we’ll look at a few ways to enhance it.

Step 1: Create a new Photoshop document

I’ll start from the beginning by creating a new document and adding the text. But if you’ve already done that, you can skip ahead to Step 5.

Or if you’re in Photoshop’s main interface, create a new document by going up to the File menu and choosing New:

Then in the New Document dialog box, enter your settings. I’ll set the Width to 3000 pixels and the Height to 1800. The Resolution is 300 pixels per inch. The Color Mode is RGB. Background Contents is set to White. And the Color Profile is sRGB:

The new document settings.

Step 2: Add your text

To add the text, select the Type Tool from Photoshop’s toolbar:

Selecting the Type Tool.

And then in the Options Bar, choose your font. Since we’ll be placing images into the text, larger fonts will work best. I’m using HWT Artz which I installed from Adobe Fonts:

Choosing a font in the Options Bar.

Set the type Size to 72 points so we’re starting with the largest preset size:

The type size option.

And to make it easier to center the text in the document, set the Justification to Center:

The type justification option.

Choosing black in the Color Picker.

Adding the text to the document.

Step 3: Resize and move the text with Free Transform

To resize the text, go up to the Edit menu in the Menu Bar and choose Free Transform:

And then resize the text by dragging the handles. If you press and hold the Alt key on a Windows PC or the Option key on a Mac while dragging a handle, you’ll resize the text from its center:

Dragging the transform handles to resize the text.

Centering the text in the document.

Step 4: Adjust the letter spacing (optional)

In my case, the letters are a bit too close together:

The letters are spaced too close together.

To fix that, I’ll go to the Properties panel:

Going to the Properties panel.

Then down to the Character options:

Going to the Character options.

On my keyboard, I’ll press the Up Arrow key once to increase the tracking value from 0 to 20. Then I’ll press Enter (Win) / Return (Mac) on my keyboard to accept it:

Increasing the Tracking value to 20.

And that spaces the letters a bit farther apart:

The letter spacing has been increased.

Step 5: Convert the type into a shape

At this point, we’re ready to place our images into the text. And in the Layers panel, we see the text on a type layer:

The type layer above the Background layer.

If we were placing a single image into the entire word, we could leave the text as standard type. But we want to place a different image in each letter. So we need a way to split the word into its individual letters. To do that, we’ll convert the type into a shape.

With the type layer selected, go up to the Type menu in the Menu Bar:

Opening the Type menu.

And choose Convert to Shape:

Choosing the Convert to Shape command.

You’ll know that the letters are now shapes by the path outlines around them:

A path outline appears around each letter.

And in the Layers panel, the shape icon in the preview thumbnail tells us that the type layer is now a shape layer:

Shape layers have their own icons in the preview thumbnail.

Step 6: Make a copy of the shape layer for each letter

We need to place each letter on its own separate layer. And to do that, we need to make a copy of the shape layer for each letter in the word. In my case, I have three letters. So since I already have the first shape layer, I need to make two more copies.

Selecting the shape layer.

And drag it down onto the New Layer icon:

Making a copy of the shape layer.

Release your mouse button, and the first copy appears above the original:

The first copy of the shape layer.

Making a copy of the copy.

Release your mouse button, and the second copy appears. I now have three shape layers, one for each letter. If you have more than three letters, make as many copies as you need:

The second copy of the shape layer.

Step 7: Delete the unwanted letters on each shape layer

Next, delete the letters you don’t need on each layer, starting with the original shape layer.

Deleting all but the first letter on the first shape layer

Turning off the shape layers above the original.

Selecting the original shape layer.

In the toolbar, select the Path Selection Tool:

Selecting the Path Selection Tool.

Then to delete the letter, press the Backspace key on a Windows PC or the Delete key on a Mac:

The second letter has been deleted.

And press Backspace (Win) / Delete (Mac) to delete it. If you have more than three letters, continue deleting the others until only the first letter remains:

The third letter has been deleted.

Deleting all but the second letter on the second shape layer

Turning off the original shape layer.

Then turn on the shape layer above it:

Turning on the second shape layer.

Selecting the second shape layer.

Selecting the first letter.

And press Backspace (Win) / Delete (Mac) to delete it:

The first letter has been deleted.

Selecting the third letter.

And press Backspace (Win) / Delete (Mac). Only the second letter should remain on the second shape layer:

The third letter has been deleted.

Deleting all but the third letter on the third shape layer

Turn the second shape layer off:

Turning off the second shape layer.

Then turn on the third shape layer:

Turning on the third shape layer.

Selecting the third shape layer.

Dragging over part of the first two letters to select them.

Then with both letters selected, press Backspace (Win) / Delete (Mac). And now we have just the third letter on the third shape layer:

The first two letters have been deleted.

If you have more than three letters, you’ll need to continue with these steps for each additional shape layer. But in my case, I have all the layers I need, and if I turn all three shape layers back on:

Turning all the shape layers back on.

The entire word reappears:

All three letters are again visible.

Download this tutorial as a print-ready PDF!

Step 8: Place the first image into the document

So with each letter on its own layer, we’re ready to add our images. We’ll start by placing an image into the first letter.

Reselecting the first shape layer.

Turning off the shape layers above it.

We want the image to appear on a layer directly above the letter it’s being placed into. So make sure you have the first shape layer selected. Then to add an image, go up to the File menu:

Opening the File menu.

And choose Place Embedded:

Choosing the Place Embedded command.

Selecting the image to place into the first letter.

The image opens in the document (woman with tulips from Adobe Stock). And if the image is larger than your document size, it’s automatically resized to fit:

The first image opens.

Step 9: Create a clipping mask

Also notice in the Layers panel that Photoshop added the image on its own layer directly above the first letter, which is exactly where we want it:

The image was added above the first letter.

Learn how to open multiple images as layers into Photoshop!

And choose Create Clipping Mask:

Choosing the Create Clipping Mask command.

The clipping mask hides any part of the image that’s not sitting directly above the letter, which creates the illusion that the image is actually inside it:

The image appears inside the letter after creating the clipping mask.

Step 10: Resize and move the image inside the first letter

Then to move and resize the image within the letter, go up to the Edit menu and choose Free Transform:

Drag your subject into view inside the letter:

Moving the image into position.

And drag the handles to resize the image within the letter. You’ll probably need to go back and forth between moving and resizing until it looks right:

Resizing the image.

Step 11: Place the second image into the document

Then just repeat the same steps to place your images into the other letters.

In the Layers panel, turn on the second letter:

Turning on the second shape layer.

Selecting the second shape layer.

Go up to the File menu and choose Place Embedded:

Selecting the image to place into the second letter.

The image opens in the document (beared man from Adobe Stock). And again Photoshop opens the Free Transform command which we don’t need just yet:

The second image opens, and so does Free Transform.

Step 12: Create a clipping mask

In the Layers panel, we see that the image was added above the second letter, right where we need it:

The image was added above the second letter.

And choose Create Clipping Mask:

Choosing the Create Clipping Mask command.

The clipping mask places the image inside the letter:

The second image is now inside the second letter.

Step 13: Resize and move the image inside the second letter

Go up to the Edit menu and choose Free Transform:

And then drag your subject into view inside the second letter:

Moving the second image into position.

And drag the handles to resize the image as needed:

Resizing the second image.

Step 14: Place the third image into the document

Turning on the third shape layer.

Selecting the third shape layer.

Then I’ll go up to the File menu and choose Place Embedded:

Selecting the image to place into the third letter.

When the image opens (smiling woman from Adobe Stock):

The third image opens in the document.

And again in the Layers panel, we see the image on its own layer above the letter:

The image was added above the third letter.

Step 15: Create a clipping mask

And I’ll choose Create Clipping Mask:

Choosing the Create Clipping Mask command.

This places the image inside the letter:

The third image is now inside the third letter.

Step 16: Resize and move the image inside the third letter

Then I’ll go back to the Edit menu and back to Free Transform:

I’ll drag the woman into view:

Moving the third image into position.

And I’ll drag the handles to resize the image:

Resizing the third image.

And now every letter in the word has a different image placed inside it:

All three images have been placed into the text.

Placing the letters and images into a group

At this point, the main effect is done. We’ve placed all of our images into the text. But there’s a few more things we can do. We can change the background color, or remove the background completely and make it transparent. And we can add layer effects like a stroke or a drop shadow. I’ll show you how to do each of these things in a moment.

But first, let’s take all of the image layers and shape layers that make up the effect and place them into a group. This will make everything else we’re about to do easier.

Step 1: Select all shape and image layers

Selecting the top image layer.

Step 2: Select New Group from Layers

And choose New Group from Layers:

Choosing the New Group from Layers command.

Step 3: Name the new group

Naming the group.

The new layer group.

How to remove the background behind the letters

So what if you want to remove the background behind the letters and make it transparent?

Turning off the background.

And now we have a checkerboard pattern for a background which is how Photoshop represents transparency:

The background behind the letters is now transparent.

That’s not what I want though, so I’ll turn the Background layer back on:

Turning the Background layer on.

How to change the background color

Selecting the Background layer.

And choose a Solid Color fill layer:

Choosing Solid Color from the list.

Option 1: Choosing a color from the Color Picker

To choose a new background color, you could select one from the Color Picker. The default color is black which often works well, but you can choose any color you like:

Choosing a new background color from the Color Picker.

Option 2: Sampling a color from an image

Sampling a new background color from one of the images.

Choosing a light gray.

And here’s my result with the light gray background:

The new background color.

The Solid Color fill layer.

Adding a stroke around the letters

Let’s finish things off by adding a stroke and a drop shadow to the letters. We’ll start with a stroke. But rather than adding the effects to each letter one at a time, we can add them to every letter at once by applying them to the group.

Step 1: Select the layer group

Selecting the layer group.

Step 2: Add a stroke

And choose Stroke from the list:

Adding a Stroke effect.

Step 3: Choose the stroke color

Choosing white from the Color Picker.

Step 4: Change the position to Outside

Change the Position of the Stroke to Outside so it appears around the outside of the letters:

Changing the Position to Outside.

Step 5: Adjust the stroke size

And then drag the Size slider to set the stroke width. I’ll set mine to 16 pixels:

Adjusting the stroke size with the slider.

Since we applied the stroke to the group, it appears around every letter at once:

The white stroke appears around the letters.

Adding a drop shadow behind the letters

Finally, let’s add a drop shadow. And then I’ll show you a quick tip for centering your text in the document.

Step 1: Select Drop Shadow from the Layer Style dialog box

Adding a drop shadow.

Step 2: Adjust the shadow’s angle, distance and size

Related: Add a long shadow effect to your text!

Or you can enter specific values in the Layer Style dialog box. I’ll set the Angle to 120 degrees and the Distance to 50 pixels. Then to soften the shadow edges, I’ll increase the Size to 25 pixels:

Setting the Angle, Distance and Size of the drop shadow.

Step 3: Close the Layer Style dialog box

And here’s the result with the stroke and the drop shadow added. Again, since we applied the drop shadow to the group, it was added to every letter inside the group at once:

The result after adding the layer effects.

Back in the Layers panel, we see our Stroke and Drop Shadow listed below the group:

The layer effects are listed below the group.

Tip! How to center the text in the document

Here’s one final tip if you want to make sure that your text is centered in the document.

Step 1: Select the group

First make sure the group is selected:

Selecting the layer group.

Step 2: Select the Move Tool

Then select the Move Tool from the toolbar:

Selecting the Move Tool.

Step 3: Open the Align and Distribute options Step 4: Set the Align To option to Canvas

Set the Align To option to Canvas:

Setting Align To to Canvas.

And here’s the final result with the text perfectly centered:

The final, centered result.

And there we have it! For a similar effect, learn how to place an image in a shape with Photoshop, or how to add transparent text to an image. And don’t forget, all of our Photoshop tutorials are available to download as PDFs!

How To Enable Print Background Colors And Images On Browser

How to Enable Print Background Colors and Images on Browser Tweak your printing settings to get the desired image output

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Given the fact that color cartridges can be expensive and hard to come by for some users, browsers have the default printing option to be in black and white.

This is an inconvenience for users who own color cartridges and want to print their images with beautiful colors on them.

Luckily, it is very simple to enable the printing of background colors and images on browsers such as Internet Explorer, Edge, Mozilla Firefox, and Google Chrome.

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Because printer ink isn’t exactly the cheapest office material to come by, it goes without saying that you’d want to be very careful about how you actually use it.

Because of this, many programs, and even the printers themselves are set by default to save ink whenever given the chance.

For example, most of the time when you try to print a web page, you’re probably interested more in the text and other elements such as icons or images.

As such, the printing of background colors and images is disabled by default in some web browser applications.

This guide is here to help you figure out how to disable this function, depending on the browser you are using.

How can I print background colors in Internet Explorer? 1. Internet Explorer 10

Launch IE.

Navigate to the File tab.

Select Page Setup.

Check the Background Colors and Images box.

2. Internet Explorer 11

Keep in mind that IE is a pretty old browser. The only IE version currently supported by Microsoft is Internet Explorer 11.

For this reason, if you’re still using IE, we strongly recommend installing a newer browser.

This extension is a lightweight and useful add-in designed to get a print fast. On top of that, you can choose the style and the Print button design.

Opera

Multiple great features created for users’ needs to improve the browsing experience.

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How can I enable the printing of background colors in Edge? How can I enable the printing of background colors in Firefox? How to enable print background colors and images in Chrome?

1. Launch Google Chrome.

3. Select the Print… option.

4. Navigate to the Colors section from the menu that opened.

6. Select Color.

8. Check the box next to Background graphics.

The process of enabling the printing of colors on an image opened in Chrome is simple and very similar to those for Internet Explorer and Mozilla Firefox.

What you need to do is navigate to the Print menu and select the Color option, then enable printing background graphics, prior to proceeding with the printing process.

Google Chrome used to be incapable of printing background colors and images, even with the help of third-party browser extensions. However, things have changed ever since, and you can print in color on it as well nowadays.

You should also check our list of the best browsers for printing web pages fast & effortlessly because it may provide you with extra information.

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